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South Bend, Ind. Mayor Pete ButtigiegPete ButtigiegSunday shows preview: Democrats eye two-part infrastructure push; Michigan coronavirus cases surge Buttigieg hopes cruises will return by mid-summer Biden to host bipartisan talks on infrastructure next week MORE has slipped 4 percentage points in a new Hill-HarrisX poll of the Democratic presidential primary race that finds former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenBiden eyes bigger US role in global vaccination efforts Trump says GOP will take White House in 2024 in prepared speech Kemp: Pulling All-Star game out of Atlanta will hurt business owners of color MORE still leading the pack.

The nationwide survey published Wednesday found that Buttigieg dropped from 9 percent support to 5 percent among likely Democratic voters and Democratic-leaning independents. The South Bend mayor is now in a dead heat for fourth place with former New York Mayor Michael BloombergMichael BloombergThe truth behind companies' 'net zero' climate commitments The strategy Biden needs to pass his infrastructure plan Bloomberg, former RNC chair Steele back Biden pick for civil rights division MORE, who also received 5 percent support.

Buttigieg had recently worked his way to the front of the 2020 Democratic primary, particularly in early primary and caucus states Iowa and New Hampshire. According to the RealClearPolitics averages, Buttigieg leads with 22.4 percent support in Iowa and holds second place in New Hampshire with 17.7 percent support, behind Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersHillicon Valley: Amazon wins union election — says 'our employees made the choice' On The Money: Biden .5T budget proposes major hike in social programs | GOP bashes border, policing provisions Overnight Defense: Biden proposes 3B defense budget | Criticism comes in from left and right | Pentagon moves toward new screening for extremists MORE’s (I-Vt.) 19 percent.

Biden, meanwhile, continues to top the Hill-HarrisX survey at 29 percent.

Sanders and Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenOn The Money: Biden .5T budget proposes major hike in social programs | GOP bashes border, policing provisions Overnight Defense: Biden proposes 3B defense budget | Criticism comes in from left and right | Pentagon moves toward new screening for extremists POW/MIA flag moved back atop White House MORE (D-Mass.) followed, each receiving 13 percent support as they jockey to claim the mantle of the party's progressive wing.

Former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julian CastroJulian CastroMore GOP-led states risk corporate backlash like Georgia's More than 200 Obama officials sign letter supporting Biden's stimulus plan OVERNIGHT ENERGY: McEachin signals interest in Biden administration environment role | Haaland, eyed for Interior, stresses need for Native American representation | Haaland backers ask Udall to step aside in bid for Interior post MORE has 4 percent support, while Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharLobbying world New small business coalition to urge action on antitrust policy Bottom line MORE (D-Minn.), tech entrepreneur Andrew YangAndrew YangEvelyn Yang pens children's book on sexual abuse, reveals she was sexually assaulted as a child Yang pitches plan to revive Broadway, live performances in New York Yang returns to campaign trail following kidney stone MORE and billionaire Tom SteyerTom SteyerSteyer says he has 'no plans' to run for public office again GOP targets ballot initiatives after progressive wins On The Trail: The political losers of 2020 MORE each garnered 3 percent. The rest of the Democratic field registered at 2 percent or less.

The survey comes ahead of Thursday’s 2020 primary debate in Los Angeles, where seven candidates are poised to take the stage.

The sixth Democratic debate has been threatened by two separate labor disputes.

The event was initially supposed to be held at the University of California-Los Angeles but was moved after a local labor group accused the university of “illegal practices” and announced that it was boycotting campus speakers.

The debate’s new location at Loyola Marymount University has also faced a boycott over a fight with a union representing university workers. All seven of the Democrats who qualified for the debate at first threatened to skip the event due to the conflict, but the union has since announced an agreement with food services company Sodexo, allowing for it to continue as planned. 

The Hill-HarrisX poll was conducted among 456 likely Democratic voters and Democratic-leaning independents between Dec. 13 and 14. It has a margin of error of 4.6 percent points.

—Tess Bonn