Ex-Trump campaign adviser: Biden would be able to 'sit down and get some things done' with Republicans

A former Trump campaign adviser defended former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenCuomo grilled by brother about running for president: 'No. no' Top Democratic super PACs team up to boost Biden The Hill's Campaign Report: Trump, Biden spar over coronavirus response MORE after the centrist Democratic candidate claimed that he would be able to break through legislative gridlock in Washington.

“The Senate is a club — it’s one of the most elite clubs in the world,” Jack KingstonJohon (Jack) Heddens KingstonEx-Trump campaign adviser: Biden would be able to 'sit down and get some things done' with Republicans The Hill's Top Lobbyists 2019 Hundreds apply to fill Isakson's Senate seat in Georgia MORE, a senior adviser to the 2016 Trump campaign, told Hill.TV on Wednesday. “I think he would have the ability to sit down and get some things done in a way that Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenDemocratic senators ask Pompeo to provide coronavirus aid to Palestinian territories Seth Meyers returning to late-night TV with 'hybrid episodes' Biden tops Trump by 9 points in Fox News poll MORE and Bernie SandersBernie SandersTop Democratic super PACs team up to boost Biden Poll: Biden leads Sanders by 22 points GE employees urge company to use laid-off workers to make ventilators MORE — also members — would not be able to do."

Biden has repeatedly pointed to his track record working with Republican colleagues to pass bipartisan legislation.

Earlier this year, he proclaimed that Republicans would have “an epiphany” and start working more with Democrats once President TrumpDonald John TrumpCuomo grilled by brother about running for president: 'No. no' Maxine Waters unleashes over Trump COVID-19 response: 'Stop congratulating yourself! You're a failure' Meadows resigns from Congress, heads to White House MORE left office.

Biden appeared to elaborate on those comments Tuesday, saying “all politics is the logical extension of human nature, personal relationships.”

He also predicted that Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellThe Hill's Campaign Report: Trump, Biden spar over coronavirus response Senator Tom Coburn's government oversight legacy Schumer praises choice of Defense inspector general to oversee corporate lending fund MORE (R-Ky.) would become “mildly cooperative” with Democrats if Trump was no longer president.

“I’m not suggesting all of a sudden everyone’s going to project a new sense of courage and political courage,” Biden said during fundraiser in New York. “What I’m suggesting [is] that the dynamic changes when the right vote, as opposed to the vote you don’t agree with, becomes a possibility if you vote for it.

“And so that’s why I think you’re going to see even Mitch McConnell changing some ideas or being more ― how can I say ― mildly cooperative,” he added later to laughter from the crowd.

However, Biden has faced some criticism for centering much of his campaign on his willingness and ability to work with Republicans.

The former Vice President received backlash last month after saying he would be willing to consider a Republican running mate in 2020, but he stopped short of naming which members of the other party he’d pick for the spot.

— Tess Bonn