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Ex-Trump campaign adviser: Biden would be able to 'sit down and get some things done' with Republicans

A former Trump campaign adviser defended former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenFacebook, Twitter CEOs to testify before Senate Judiciary Committee on Nov. 17 Sanders hits back at Trump's attack on 'socialized medicine' Senate GOP to drop documentary series days before election hitting China, Democrats over coronavirus MORE after the centrist Democratic candidate claimed that he would be able to break through legislative gridlock in Washington.

“The Senate is a club — it’s one of the most elite clubs in the world,” Jack KingstonJohon (Jack) Heddens KingstonLobbying firm cuts ties to Trent Lott amid national anti-racism protests Thankfully, the doctor is in Ex-Trump campaign adviser: Biden would be able to 'sit down and get some things done' with Republicans MORE, a senior adviser to the 2016 Trump campaign, told Hill.TV on Wednesday. “I think he would have the ability to sit down and get some things done in a way that Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenFinal debate: War Admiral vs. Seabiscuit Biden defends his health plan from Trump attacks Progressives blast Biden plan to form panel on Supreme Court reform MORE and Bernie SandersBernie SandersSanders hits back at Trump's attack on 'socialized medicine' Trump's debate performance was too little, too late Final debate: War Admiral vs. Seabiscuit MORE — also members — would not be able to do."

Biden has repeatedly pointed to his track record working with Republican colleagues to pass bipartisan legislation.

Earlier this year, he proclaimed that Republicans would have “an epiphany” and start working more with Democrats once President TrumpDonald John TrumpIvanka Trump, Jared Kusher's lawyer threatens to sue Lincoln Project over Times Square billboards Facebook, Twitter CEOs to testify before Senate Judiciary Committee on Nov. 17 Sanders hits back at Trump's attack on 'socialized medicine' MORE left office.

Biden appeared to elaborate on those comments Tuesday, saying “all politics is the logical extension of human nature, personal relationships.”

He also predicted that Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellOvernight Health Care: Following debate, Biden hammers Trump on coronavirus | Study: Universal mask-wearing could save 130,000 lives | Finger-pointing picks up in COVID-19 relief fight On The Money: Finger-pointing picks up in COVID-19 relief fight | Landlords, housing industry sue CDC to overturn eviction ban Finger-pointing picks up in COVID-19 relief fight MORE (R-Ky.) would become “mildly cooperative” with Democrats if Trump was no longer president.

“I’m not suggesting all of a sudden everyone’s going to project a new sense of courage and political courage,” Biden said during fundraiser in New York. “What I’m suggesting [is] that the dynamic changes when the right vote, as opposed to the vote you don’t agree with, becomes a possibility if you vote for it.

“And so that’s why I think you’re going to see even Mitch McConnell changing some ideas or being more ― how can I say ― mildly cooperative,” he added later to laughter from the crowd.

However, Biden has faced some criticism for centering much of his campaign on his willingness and ability to work with Republicans.

The former Vice President received backlash last month after saying he would be willing to consider a Republican running mate in 2020, but he stopped short of naming which members of the other party he’d pick for the spot.

— Tess Bonn