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Majority of voters don't believe new info will be revealed in Senate trial

A majority of voters don't believe that new information will come forth in President TrumpDonald John TrumpVenezuela judge orders prison time for 6 American oil executives Trump says he'll leave White House if Biden declared winner of Electoral College The Memo: Biden faces tough road on pledge to heal nation MORE’s impeachment trial in the Senate, according to a Hill-HarrisX survey released on Thursday.

Out of 1,001 respondents nationwide, 60 percent said that the trial would only contain evidence and data that have already been revealed. Another 40 percent said the trial would lead to “new and important information.” 

When broken down by party, Democrats were more likely to believe that the ongoing trial would introduce new evidence, while Republicans were more skeptical.

Sixty-one percent of Democratic voters said it would lead to never-before-seen evidence, compared to 25 percent of Republicans and 30 percent of independents who said the same.

The survey comes as House Democrats continue their third day of oral opening arguments the trial, focusing on trying to prove that the president abused his power in office.

The allegation stems from a whistleblower’s complaint alleging that Trump withheld military aid in an effort to pressure Ukraine to open politically motivated investigations that would have benefited him in the 2020 election.

This complaint prompted months of investigations that ultimately culminated in the House moving to impeach Trump on two charges: abuse of power and obstruction of Congress.

Republicans have already dismissed both charges as a political ruse and an attempt to overturn the results of the 2016 election. 

But Democrats, who have cast Trump as a national security threat, hope their argument will resonate with voters ahead of November's election. 

The Hill-HarrisX poll was conducted between Jan. 20-21. The margin of error is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points.

—Tess Bonn