Majority sees no ties between business experience and political success

A large majority of voters don't equate business success with political success, according to a new Hill-HarrisX poll released Monday. 

Seventy-one percent of voters surveyed say they don't think a millionaire’s business experience automatically translates to political success. 

Another 29 percent argued that these business skills do, in fact, translate to governmental expertise. 

A majority of voters said the same of billionaires — that even that level of business success doesn't necessarily lead to being successful in politics. 

Of those surveyed in the nationwide poll, 76 percent said they wouldn't link a billionaire’s background in business to their political success, while another 24 percent said that these business skills were vital to a candidate’s political success.

The sentiment was largely shared across party lines.

Most notably, 67 percent of those respondents who identified as Republican said that business skills don't translate to the political world, compared to 81 percent of those who identified as independents and 82 percent of those who identified as Democrats.

Prior to running for office, President TrumpDonald John TrumpChanges in policies, not personalities, will improve perception of corruption in the US Union leader: Bloomberg can go all the way Pelosi: 'I'm not counting Joe Biden out' MORE was a businessman and former reality TV star. Based on his real estate holdings and various business dealings, Forbes estimates that the president is worth roughly $3.1 billion, though his net worth has yet to be confirmed given that the president hasn't released his tax returns.  

The crowded Democratic primary field currently boasts three candidates who made a name for themselves in the business world.

Tom SteyerTom Fahr SteyerA Trump supporter's defense of Michael Bloomberg The Hill's Campaign Report: New challenges for 2020 Dems in Nevada, South Carolina Biden's lead shrinks in South Carolina as Sanders climbs to second: poll MORE was a former hedge fund manager before becoming a Democratic activist, while fellow billionaire and former New York City Mayor Michael BloombergMichael Rubens BloombergUnion leader: Bloomberg can go all the way Democratic rivals sharpen attacks as Bloomberg rises A Trump supporter's defense of Michael Bloomberg MORE started his own media company Bloomberg L.P.

Andrew YangAndrew YangMore accusers come forward after Evelyn Yang breaks silence on alleged assault by OBGYN Sanders leads Biden in latest Nevada poll Moderate Democrats now in a race against the clock MORE, whose net worth is estimated to be in the millions, meanwhile got his start as a tech entrepreneur. He most notably took over test prep company Manhattan Prep as CEO before later founding the nonprofit Venture for America in 2011.

All three candidates are currently polling in the single digits, according to RealClearPolitics average of national polls. Bloomberg boasts 7.7 percent support, compared to Yang’s 4.7 percent and Steyer’s 1.9 percent.

So far, Bloomberg and Yang have qualified for January’s debate in Iowa. They are set to join former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenWarren highlights work with Obama, Harry Reid in new Nevada ad Biden on Univision: Deporting 3 million 'was a big mistake' Pelosi: 'I'm not counting Joe Biden out' MORE, Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersWarren highlights work with Obama, Harry Reid in new Nevada ad Union leader: Bloomberg can go all the way Biden on Univision: Deporting 3 million 'was a big mistake' MORE (I-Vt.), Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenWarren highlights work with Obama, Harry Reid in new Nevada ad Biden on Univision: Deporting 3 million 'was a big mistake' Democratic rivals sharpen attacks as Bloomberg rises MORE (D-Mass.), former South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete ButtigiegPeter (Pete) Paul ButtigiegWill Bernie have to turn on his bros? Democratic rivals sharpen attacks as Bloomberg rises Now's a time to take a look at who's 'blooming' among Democrats MORE, Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharWill Bernie have to turn on his bros? Democratic rivals sharpen attacks as Bloomberg rises Klobuchar says English should not be US national language, reversing from prior vote MORE (D-Minn.).

The Hill-HarrisX survey was conducted online among 2,003 registered voters between Jan. 20-22. It has a margin of error of plus or minus 2.19 percentage points.

— Tess Bonn