Biden, Sanders contend for top spot, Bloomberg sees surge in Hill/HarrisX poll

Former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenPoll: Bloomberg stalls after Vegas debate Bloomberg campaign: Vandalism at Tennessee office 'echoes language from the Sanders campaign and its supporters' Democratic strategist says Biden 'has to' get second place in Nevada MORE and Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersPoll: Bloomberg stalls after Vegas debate Prominent Texas Latina endorses Warren Bloomberg campaign: Vandalism at Tennessee office 'echoes language from the Sanders campaign and its supporters' MORE (I-Vt.) are neck-and-neck in a battle for first place in a new Hill/HarrisX 2020 preference national poll.

In the Feb. 7-10 survey, 23 percent of Democratic and Democratic-leaning voters favored Joe Biden while 20 percent preferred Sanders. 

While the Vermont senator gained 3 percentage points from the last democratic preference poll, Biden dropped 6 percentage points.

Former New York City Mayor Michael BloombergMichael Rubens BloombergPoll: Bloomberg stalls after Vegas debate Bloomberg unveils billboards to troll Trump ahead of campaign stops Bloomberg campaign: Vandalism at Tennessee office 'echoes language from the Sanders campaign and its supporters' MORE surged in the poll to third place, at 16 percent, a 5 percentage point increase from the last survey. Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenPoll: Bloomberg stalls after Vegas debate Bloomberg unveils billboards to troll Trump ahead of campaign stops John Legend joining Warren in South Carolina next week: report MORE (D-Mass.) remained steady in the poll, at 9 percent, while Former South Bend, Ind. Mayor Pete ButtigiegPeter (Pete) Paul ButtigiegPoll: Bloomberg stalls after Vegas debate Bloomberg campaign: Vandalism at Tennessee office 'echoes language from the Sanders campaign and its supporters' Buttigieg to join striking South Carolina McDonald's workers next week MORE jumped 4 percentage points to tie with Warren.

Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharPoll: Bloomberg stalls after Vegas debate Washington Post fact-checker gives Bloomberg 4 Pinocchios for 'deceptive editing' in campaign ad The Hill's 12:30 Report: Dem anxiety grows ahead of Super Tuesday MORE (D-Mn.), entrepreneur Andrew YangAndrew YangHillicon Valley: Intel officials warned lawmakers Russia interfering in 2020 | Pompeo condemns Russian cyberattack on country of Georgia | Tech activists see Kickstarter union as breakthrough | Pentagon agency suffers data breach Manhattan DA investigating new abuse claims against doctor accused by Evelyn Yang March For Our Lives co-founders endorse Sanders MORE, and billionaire Tom SteyerTom Fahr SteyerThe Hill's 12:30 Report: Dem anxiety grows ahead of Super Tuesday Five takeaways from new fundraising reports for 2020 Democrats Buttigieg and Biden haven't invested in any ads in the crucial Super Tuesday states: WSJ analysis MORE all received 3 percent in the poll. 

All other candidates received 2 percent or less and 11 percent of voters are still undecided.

Despite his recent drop in the polls, experts have noted Biden's strong support among African Americans and older voters, a factor that might keep him at the top of the leaderboard nationally, if support holds. 

"Biden’s strength with African Americans and older voters is keeping him at the top of the polls, though Sanders base is loyal," Molly Murphy, Democratic pollster and Partner of ALG Research told The Hill.

"What is interesting is that in the last 10 or so days, Mike Bloomberg is beginning to surge, outperforming Buttigieg on the heels of his Iowa win, and only slightly behind Sanders and Biden," she added.

Sanders and Bloomberg have gained ground in other nation-wide surveys, including recent Quinnipiac University and Monmouth University polls.

The candidates face off tonight in New Hampshire in the first primary election of the season, where Sanders has been leading in recent surveys.

The Hill-HarrisX poll was conducted online among 913 registered Democratic and Democratic-leaning Independent voters between Feb. 7 and 10. It has a margin of error of plus or minus 3.2 percentage points.

 — Gabriela Schulte