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Sanders aide: Biden stronger with white, working-class men than Clinton

A former aide to Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersBriahna Joy Gray: Biden campaign promises will struggle if Republicans win back Congress Biden backs COVID-19 vaccine patent waivers McConnell sidesteps Cheney-Trump drama MORE (I-Vt.) on Monday said that presumptive Democratic nominee Joe BidenJoe BidenCaitlyn Jenner on Hannity touts Trump: 'He was a disruptor' Argentina launches 'Green Mondays' campaign to cut greenhouse gases On The Money: Federal judge vacates CDC's eviction moratorium | Biden says he's open to compromise on corporate tax rate | Treasury unsure of how long it can stave off default without debt limit hike MORE performs stronger with white, working-class men than Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonPelosi's archbishop calls for Communion to be withheld from public figures supporting abortion rights Hillary Clinton: Biden less 'constrained' than Clinton and Obama due to prior administration Biden's unavoidable foreign policy crisis MORE did in 2016.

Chuck Rocha, a senior adviser to Sanders’s 2020 bid, told Hill.TV that blue-collar men approve of Biden much more than they did of Clinton in her White House bid.

“We saw over and over in our polling that he performed better than her there, so he’s got to take advantage of that and get more of that,” he said. 

Rocha, who is also the president and founder of Solidarity Strategies, said the former vice president has to even out his advantage among white, working-class men with his disadvantages among Latinos, people under 35 and some working-class, educated white women.

“But there’s time to make that up,” he said. “A lot of that is going in and having a conversation.”

The former adviser said he expects campaign consultants to be “super focused” on getting the support of President TrumpDonald TrumpCaitlyn Jenner on Hannity touts Trump: 'He was a disruptor' Ivanka Trump doubles down on vaccine push with post celebrating second shot Conservative Club for Growth PAC comes out against Stefanik to replace Cheney MORE voters, who had once voted for former President Obama, instead of younger and more diverse demographics. 

“You can spend that money in black and brown neighborhoods and reaching out to the youth and get so much more of a turn on your dollar,” he said. “But a regular establishment consultant won’t do that because it’s outside the norm of how you’re really supposed to run a campaign.”

Sanders dropped out of the presidential race earlier this month, making Biden the presumptive Democratic nominee on the ticket in 2020.