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National reporter Jonathan Easley discusses challenges in Biden's first 100 days

Jonathan Easley, a national political reporter with The Hill, discussed with Hill.TV where Democrats fell short in the election and what President-elect Joe BidenJoe BidenFear of insider attack prompts additional FBI screening of National Guard troops: AP Iran convicts American businessman on spying charge: report DC, state capitals see few issues, heavy security amid protest worries MORE needs to do to address voter concerns as he takes office.

“What a lot of these voters who surprisingly voted for [President] Trump or weren’t enthusiastic about voting for Democrats want to see is Democrats addressing these bread and butter economic issues,” Easley said.

He said the policies Biden decides to focus on during his first 100 days in office will let Americans see “where his priorities lie.”

Easley told Hill.TV co-host Saagar Enjeti that Biden has said climate change and an executive order on immigration are among his top issues, but "those are items that don’t necessarily address some of the things that you and I have been talking about."

“Raising minimum wage, expanding access to health care, these are the kinds of economic issues that drive votes. As important as climate change is, it’s just not anywhere close to the top of voter concerns and it’s not the kind of thing that focusing on that has proven to win elections,” he said.

Easley went on to say that Democrats will need to find a new focal point in the near future that is more than an anti-Donald TrumpDonald TrumpIran convicts American businessman on spying charge: report DC, state capitals see few issues, heavy security amid protest worries Pardon-seekers have paid Trump allies tens of thousands to lobby president: NYT MORE sentiment.

“At some point, the party does need to calibrate its message for this post-Trump era that we’re entering,” he said. “A lot of what we heard from Democrats during this election sort of papered over the fact that they didn’t have a very clear economic message, that they were weaker with some of these groups that they considered to be the base of their party.”

Easley emphasized the need for Democrats to double down on a clear economic message and shift away from Trump.

“All that said, they’re going to have to recalibrate some here as Trump leaves the White House.”