SPONSORED:

Former Sanders spokesperson: Progressive base confused by 'ambiguity' over how to replace Pelosi

Briahna Joy Gray, the former campaign press secretary for Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersOn The Money: Democrats deals to bolster support for relief bill | Biden tries to keep Democrats together | Retailers fear a return of the mask wars Democrats cut deals to bolster support for relief bill Hillicon Valley: High alert as new QAnon date approaches Thursday | Biden signals another reversal from Trump with national security guidance | Parler files a new case MORE (I-Vt.), on reacted to comments by Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezBipartisan bill would ban lawmakers from buying, selling stocks The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - J&J vax rollout today; third woman accuses Cuomo 'Lucky': Inside Ocasio-Cortez's endorsement of Sanders MORE (D-N.Y.) in which she said Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiOn The Money: Democrats deals to bolster support for relief bill | Biden tries to keep Democrats together | Retailers fear a return of the mask wars Here's who Biden is now considering for budget chief Biden urges Democrats to advocate for rescue package MORE (D-Calif.) should be replaced but that there was no one currently capable of doing the job.

“There’s kind of two different conversations going on here,” the “Bad Faith” podcast host said in a HillTV interview. She noted that the strategy called for by political commentator Jimmy Dore proposed for progressive members of Congress like Ocasio-Cortez to use the leadership vote as leverage for progressive proposals rather than viewing ousting Pelosi as a goal.

In contrast, she said, “this question of whether Pelosi should be ousted altogether, and whether we have to do so because there’s not someone in the ranks, is a new one.”

“It’s an interesting conversation given that we’ve had now two years of these progressive ‘Squad’ members in office who came in really hot to do something about Nancy Pelosi and to threaten her leadership at that point,” she added.

Some members of the progressive base, Gray said, may be unsure of “what to think about the idea that two years later, there’s still so much ambiguity about what to do to replace Nancy Pelosi.”