Political analyst: Trump's attorneys 'should be disbarred' if they allow him to talk to Mueller

If President TrumpDonald John TrumpConway defends herself against Hatch Act allegations amid threat of subpoena How to defuse Gulf tensions and avoid war with Iran Trump says 'stubborn child' Fed 'blew it' by not cutting rates MORE’s attorneys allow him to testify in Department of Justice special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerKamala Harris says her Justice Dept would have 'no choice' but to prosecute Trump for obstruction Dem committees win new powers to investigate Trump Schiff says Intel panel will hold 'series' of hearings on Mueller report MORE’s investigation into Russian election interference they will be guilty of legal malpractice, veteran political journalist Carl M. Cannon said Friday.

“A lawyer who let Trump talk to Mueller should be disbarred. In fact, just turn in your license [to practice law], don’t even bother being disbarred,” Cannon said during a panel discussion Friday on Hill.TV's “What America’s Thinking.” 

According to Cannon, the Washington Bureau Chief of RealClearPolitics, the president would be walking into a “perjury trap” by talking to Mueller, given the frequency with which he makes false statements.

“Donald Trump is not going to be able to be as precise as a prosecutor would like,” Cannon told Hill.TV host Joe Concha in response to whether Trump’s attorneys would allow him to testify for Mueller's probe.

Cannon said many Democrats denounced former independent counsel Kenneth Starr for constructing a “perjury trap” for then-President Bill ClintonWilliam (Bill) Jefferson ClintonBiden, Eastland and rejecting the cult of civility Democrats not keen to reignite Jerusalem embassy fight The bottom dollar on recession, Trump's base, and his reelection prospects MORE in the 1990s. Clinton was later impeached by the House for making false statements to a grand jury assembled by Starr.

Trump's attorneys have been in close negotiations with Mueller for months over whether to grant an interview to the special counsel and what parameters are allowed to be put on their conversation.

Earlier this month, the president’s legal team sent a letter requesting that the investigation be concluded by Sept. 1.

The letter, first reported on by The New York Times, details eight months of negotiations between Trump layers and the special counsel over the terms of a possible interview.

According to The Washington Post, the letter allows for the possibility of Trump answering some questions in writing.

In response to the letter, an unnamed Trump adviser told The Washington Post, "If you don’t want to accuse someone of perjury, you don’t need to have them answer questions under oath."

On Wednesday, Trump attorney Rudy Giuliani said his team would fight a potential subpoena from the special counsel all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court.

According to the Washington Post’s “Fact Checker” blog, through Aug. 1, Trump has made over 4,200 false or misleading claims since his inauguration.