Dem pollster: Kavanaugh's confirmation hearing may not hold same weight as Gorsuch's

Democratic pollster Nancy Zdunkewicz argued Tuesday that the confirmation hearing for Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh may not hold as much weight as the hearing for President TrumpDonald John TrumpGrassroots America shows the people support Donald Trump Trump speaks to rebel Libyan general attacking Tripoli Dem lawmaker: Mueller report shows 'substantial body of evidence' on obstruction MORE's last nominee, Neil Gorsuch.

"It is happening before the midterms, so it might not have the same weight as the Neil Gorsuch vote did in that the opportunity to appoint somebody as opposed to having it already happened," Zdunkewicz told Hill.TV's Joe Concha on "What America's Thinking."

Trump nominated Gorsuch early last year to replace the late Justice Antonin Scalia after Senate Republicans refused to give Merrick GarlandMerrick Brian GarlandThe Hill's Morning Report — Category 5 Mueller storm to hit today McConnell touts Trump support, Supreme Court fights in reelection video Hatch warns 'dangerous' idea of court packing could hurt religious liberty MORE, former President Obama's pick to replace Scalia, a vote or a hearing in 2016.

Senate Republicans cited the heated White House race that year in blocking the appointment, arguing that the decision to fill Scalia's seat should be made by the next president.

Republicans want Kavanaugh on the high court as early as the beginning of October and have said they will not delay a final vote until after the November midterm elections, as demanded by some Democrats.

Senate Democrats argue that Kavanaugh's records, including key documents from his time serving as a staff secretary in George W. Bush's White House, require a more in-depth review before his confirmation hearing.

However, the National Archives said it would not be able to fulfill Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleyOn The Money: Inside the Mueller report | Cain undeterred in push for Fed seat | Analysis finds modest boost to economy from new NAFTA | White House says deal will give auto sector B boost The 7 most interesting nuggets from the Mueller report Government report says new NAFTA would have minimal impact on economy MORE's (R-Iowa) request for the documents until late October.

Republicans have said that a legal team for Bush is going over the same documents and will be able to hand over the materials at a faster pace, while Democrats have said the arrangement could allow for the GOP to cherry-pick what information is publicly released.

— Julia Manchester