The Hill's Reid Wilson: Senators now have 'national spotlight' to boost presidential prospects

The Hill campaign reporter Reid Wilson said on Tuesday that senators are using the national media to promote their presidential ambitions. 

"It used to be that a party would nominate a governor, and that governor would do well because he or she was outside of Washington and could talk about fomenting change in D.C.," Wilson told Hill.TV's Joe Concha on "What America's Thinking."

"Now it's the U.S. senators who have that national spotlight, and get the media attention on Fox News, on MSNBC, on Hill.TV, and therefore get the attention of the activist class that is so coveted at this early point in that cycle," he continued. 

Wilson's comments come as speculation swirls around whether various high-profile senators, including Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisJoe Biden faces an uncertain path Biden: 'There's an awful lot of really good Republicans out there' Fighter pilot vs. astronaut match-up in Arizona could determine control of Senate MORE (D-Calif.), Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerThe Hill's Campaign Report: Battle for Senate begins to take shape Steve King to Gillibrand: Odds of me resigning same as yours of winning presidential nomination We need a climate plan for agriculture MORE (D-N.J.), Kirsten GillibrandKirsten Elizabeth GillibrandGillibrand: Rosy economic outlook not 'reflected in everyday, kitchen-table issues families are facing' Chris Wallace becomes Trump era's 'equal opportunity inquisitor' Steve King to Gillibrand: Odds of me resigning same as yours of winning presidential nomination MORE (D-N.Y.) and Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenPossible GOP challenger says Trump doesn't doesn't deserve reelection, but would vote for him over Democrat Joe Biden faces an uncertain path The Memo: Trump pushes back amid signs of economic slowdown MORE (D-Mass.), will launch 2018 presidential bids. 

Harris and Booker, who both sit on the Senate Judiciary Committee, found themselves in the national spotlight on Tuesday during the confirmation hearing for Judge Brett Kavanaugh, President TrumpDonald John TrumpO'Rourke: Trump driving global, U.S. economy into recession Manchin: Trump has 'golden opportunity' on gun reforms Objections to Trump's new immigration rule wildly exaggerated MORE's Supreme Court nominee.

The two senators joined other Democrats on the committee in trying to delay Kavanaugh's confirmation to give them time to examine thousands of recently released documents from his work under former President George W. Bush.

— Julia Manchester