National mood will help Dems in House races, says pollster

Pollster Molly Murphy said on Wednesday that the general national mood will help Democrats in their goal of taking back the House in this November's midterm elections.  

"I think at the House level, that is a little bit easier to do because I think sometimes the, sort of, national environment plays a big role in how people are going to vote," Murphy, a partner at ALG Research, told Hill.TV's Joe Concha on "What America's Thinking." 

"I think when it comes to the Senate, first off, we're looking at some particularly challenging states that are up for reelection for Democrats to hold, a great number of states that were won by President TrumpDonald John TrumpActivists highlight Trump ties to foreign autocrats in hotel light display Jose Canseco pitches Trump for chief of staff: ‘Worried about you looking more like a Twinkie everyday’ Dershowitz: Mueller's report will contain 'sins' but no 'impeachable offense' MORE by sizeable margins, so there's a little bit of cushion there," she continued. 

Murphy said that the Senate will also prove to be more difficult for Democrats because Senate candidates are more able to separate themselves from the national mood due to the amount of campaign funding and resources they receive.   

"But I do think that the Senate can be a little bit more of a challenge because there is just such an inordinate amount of money spent in these races that the candidates are able to define themselves and their opposition in a way that may allow them to sort of eke out from underneath the partisan environment," she said. 

Democrats hold an 8-point lead over Republicans on the 2018 generic ballot, according to the RealClearPolitics average of congressional voting surveys.

Democrats need 24 seats to take back the House.

President Trump has remained optimistic that Republicans will do well in November, but his approval rating, which has recently stayed between 40 and 50 percent, has caused some Republicans to be concerned about his impact on the vote. 

— Julia Manchester