Distrust of media reflects larger loss of trust in institutions, says pollster

Pollster Mallory Newall said on Monday that Americans' distrust of the news media is reflective of a large distrust in U.S. institutions in general. 

"We've seen a massive decline in institutional trust generally. For the news media, for institutions of all kinds over the past four decades," Newall, research director at Ipsos, told Hill.TV's Joe Concha on "What America's Thinking."

"Ipsos has done a little bit of research on this, and we found that people are just less trusting now, generally. Not only of institutions but of other people," she continued. 

"There's this idea of you know, sticking to a more tribalized view on things, particularly the news media being one of them," she said. 

The annual Edelman Trust Barometer, released earlier this year, found that public trust in the government, media, business, and non-government organizations had a steeper decline in the U.S. than it did in the 28 other countries that were surveyed. 

Trump has repeatedly attacked institutions such as the media, and its coverage of special counsel Robert MuellerRobert Swan MuellerSasse: US should applaud choice of Mueller to lead Russia probe MORE's probe into Russian election meddling. 

Newall said that Americans' views on the issue will most likely reflect partisanship, rather than the media's coverage. 

"I think that you are likely to believe that the investigation is politically motivated or not based on your partisan outlook. It has nothing to do with what the media is telling or what people are hearing from the media," she said. 

"If you believe one thing, if you're a Republican, you're more likely to believe that it's politically motivated, and if you're a Democrat, you're more likely to believe that the investigation is necessary," she continued. 

"I think those views hold true regardless of people's views and outlook on the media." 

— Julia Manchester