‘None of the above’ tops list of potential 2020 Dems, poll shows

With the 2018 midterms in the rearview mirror, several Democrats are gearing up for the 2020 presidential contest. But so far, no Democrat has attracted broad support from the party's base, according to a new Hill.TV American Barometer poll.

The survey, conducted among 680 registered voters who identified themselves as Democrats or independents, found that "none of the above" was the most popular choice among potential 2020 challengers to President TrumpDonald John TrumpHouse Freedom Caucus calls for Congress to work on shutdown through break Democrat previews Mueller questions for Trump’s AG nominee Trump inaugural committee spent ,000 on makeup for aides: report MORE.

Thirty percent of the sample said they would prefer that "none of the above" become the Democratic nominee when asked to choose among former Vice President Joe BidenJoseph (Joe) Robinette BidenGillibrand to kickstart 2020 White House bid before weekend Iowa trip Harry Reid on Iraq War vote: 'It tainted my heart' New Hampshire is ‘must-win’ state for Warren, says veteran political reporter MORE, Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenGOP senators rebuke Trump for using 'Wounded Knee' as 'punchline' Julián Castro: Trump has 'contributed to more racial strife' in the US Gillibrand to kickstart 2020 White House bid before weekend Iowa trip MORE (D), Vermont Sen. Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersOn The Money: Shutdown hits Day 24 | Trump touts need for wall in speech to farmers | Poll numbers sag | House Dems push stopgap bills | How the shutdown could harm the economy | TSA absences raise stakes for deal Overnight Health Care: House Dems launch major drug pricing investigation | Judge blocks Trump contraception rule rollback | Booker tries to shake doubts about pharmaceutical ties ahead of 2020 | FDA to resume high-risk food inspections Gillibrand to kickstart 2020 White House bid before weekend Iowa trip MORE (I), New Jersey Sen. Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerOvernight Health Care: House Dems launch major drug pricing investigation | Judge blocks Trump contraception rule rollback | Booker tries to shake doubts about pharmaceutical ties ahead of 2020 | FDA to resume high-risk food inspections Gillibrand to kickstart 2020 White House bid before weekend Iowa trip The Hill's Morning Report — Washington searches for answers as shutdown hits 24 days MORE (D), California Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisJulián Castro: Trump has 'contributed to more racial strife' in the US Hillicon Valley: Dem blasts groups behind Senate campaign disinformation effort | FCC chief declines to give briefing on location-data sales | Ocasio-Cortez tops lawmakers on social media | Trump officials to ease drone rules Gillibrand to visit 'The Late Show' amid reported 2020 plans MORE (D), former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg and former Secretary of State Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonTrump boasts about checking gas prices while in motorcade: 'You think Hillary Clinton would've done that?' Harry Reid on Iraq War vote: 'It tainted my heart' New Hampshire is ‘must-win’ state for Warren, says veteran political reporter MORE.

Twenty-five percent of respondents said Biden would be their preferred nominee. Sanders, who ran in the Democratic presidential primary in 2016, came in second with 18 percent.

Twelve percent of the independents and Democrats surveyed picked Clinton, Sanders's one-time presidential rival, who signaled a willingness to run again, saying in an October interviewer that she would still "like to be president."

Other candidates attracted even less support. Harris, Bloomberg and Warren were each the top choice for just 4 percent of respondents.

Warren had been regarded by some progressive advocates as a strong candidate, but she may have lost some support after provoking controversy by releasing a DNA test to address persistent questions about her claims of Native American heritage. A Morning Consult/Politico poll from October found that just 34 percent of Democratic respondents believed Warren's actions were "appropriate."

The American Barometer survey was conducted on Nov. 5-6 among 680 registered voters by the HarrisX polling company. The sampling margin of error is 3.76 percentage points.

— Matthew Sheffield