Majority says court ruling striking down ObamaCare should stand, poll shows

A majority of respondents say they think that a Texas federal judge's ruling last month that ObamaCare is invalid should stand, according to a new Hill-HarrisX poll.

Of those surveyed, 58 percent said they believe U.S. District Court Judge Reed O'Connor's ruling that the Affordable Care Act is invalid should stand. 

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Thirty-one percent of respondents said that former President Obama's signature health care law should be invalidated by the courts and that Congress and President TrumpDonald John TrumpSenate GOP budget ignores Trump, cuts defense Trump says he'll nominate Stephen Moore to Fed White House: ISIS territory in Syria has been 100 percent eliminated MORE should start over on implementing new health care policy. 

Another 27 percent said the law should be invalidated, and that health care should go back to how it was prior to the passage of the act. 

Forty-three percent of respondents said the ruling should be reversed, and the law should stand. 

"Six out of ten voters either want to go back to the way things were or start over," Republican pollster Ashlee Rich Stephenson told Hill.TV's Joe Concha on "What America's Thinking."

"This fight is far from over."

O'Connor last month ruled in favor of a group of 20 Republican-led states seeking to overturn the health care law.

O'Connor argued that the entire law was invalid because parts of it were unconstitutional. 

Last week, House Democrats filed a motion asking the court to allow the House to intervene as a defendant in the Republican-led lawsuit against ObamaCare, alongside a group of Democratic state attorneys general, since the Trump administration has declined to defend the law.

The Justice Department on Monday requested that a federal judge pause all briefings related to the motion due to the government shutdown. 

The latest Hill-HarrisX survey was conducted Jan. 5-6 and is part of an ongoing project of The Hill's online TV division, Hill.TV, and the HarrisX polling company that asks 1,000 registered voters a day about issues of public policy and current events. The latest poll has a margin of error of plus or minus 3.1 percentage points.

— Julia Manchester