Election analyst says Dems will fall in line with any 2020 nominee the party elects

Election analyst Henry Olsen predicted Friday that the Democratic Party's progressive wing ultimately will fall in line with any Democratic presidential nominee voters elect because of their disdain for President TrumpDonald John TrumpCould Donald Trump and Boris Johnson be this generation's Reagan-Thatcher? Merkel backs Democratic congresswomen over Trump How China's currency manipulation cheats America on trade MORE

"When push comes to shove, the Democratic base hates Trump so much that I think even many progressives would swallow disagreement if they lose that internal debate in order to get rid of the devil that they hate," Olsen, a columnist at The Washington Post, told Hill.TV's Jamal Simmons on "What America's Thinking." 

"You've got different candidates who are throwing in with different styles, different policy mixes," he continued. 

"I think you've had at least five of the contenders in the Senate who have co-sponsored the Senate version of the Green New Deal," he said, referencing the climate resolution unveiled by progressive firebrand Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezTop Missouri newspaper condemns GOP's 'shameful silence' on Trump's 'racism' Restaurant in city where Trump rally held donating profits to immigrants Crowd chanting 'welcome home Ilhan' greets Omar at airport MORE (D-N.Y.) this week. "Then you've got Democrats who haven't signed on to that."

Democratic presidential candidates, including Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisBiden leads, Warren and Sanders tied for second in new poll Analysis: Harris, Buttigieg and Trump lead among California donations The Hill's Morning Report: Trump walks back from 'send her back' chants MORE (Calif.) and Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenWarren adds her pronouns to Twitter bio Biden leads, Warren and Sanders tied for second in new poll The Hill's Morning Report: Trump walks back from 'send her back' chants MORE (Mass.), have embraced progressive ideas such as the Green New Deal or "Medicare for all." 

Still, other Democrats and observers have said the party should not concern itself with appealing to progressive voters as much as appealing to blue-collar voters who flipped for Trump in 2016. 

— Julia Manchester