Most voters view Green New Deal as 'largely socialist,' poll shows

Two-thirds of voters say they view the recently introduced Green New Deal being advocated by progressive lawmakers as "largely socialist," according to a new Hill-HarrisX poll.

Sixty-seven percent of voters surveyed in the poll released Thursday said they view the proposal introduced last month by Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezOn The Money: Senate passes disaster aid bill after deal with Trump | Trump to offer B aid package for farmers | House votes to boost retirement savings | Study says new tariffs to double costs for consumers Murkowski celebrates birthday with electric scooter ride Warren, Ocasio-Cortez press Mnuchin on role in Sears bankruptcy MORE (D-N.Y.) and Sen. Ed MarkeyEdward (Ed) John MarkeyHillicon Valley: Assange hit with 17 more charges | Facebook removes record 2.2B fake profiles | Senate passes anti-robocall bill | Senators offer bill to help companies remove Huawei equipment Senate passes anti-robocall bill The Hill's 12:30 Report: Pelosi fires back in feud with Trump MORE (D-Mass.) as "largely socialist," while 33 percent said they would describe it as "largely capitalist."

While the poll did not gauge support or opposition to the proposal itself, it found that a majority of voters from across the political spectrum view the measure as "largely socialist," including 73 percent of Republicans, 67 percent of Democrats and 65 percent of independents.

The Green New Deal is one of several progressive proposals that has quickly garnered the support of 2020 Democratic White House hopefuls.

Nearly all of the Senate Democrats who are running for president have backed the proposal, while another candidate, Rep. Tulsi GabbardTulsi GabbardCNN's O'Rourke town hall finishes behind Fox News, MSNBC Progressive Democrat says Trump victory shed light on divide between Silicon Valley, rural US Anita Hill: Female 2020 Democrats 'not being taken seriously' MORE (D-Hawaii), said last week that she had concerns about the "vagueness" of the measure.

The Hill-HarrisX poll found that other proposals being backed by certain progressives running in 2020 are also viewed as "largely socialist."

Seventy-four percent of respondents said universal daycare, which has been proposed by 2020 candidate Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenThe Hill's Morning Report — After contentious week, Trump heads for Japan On The Money: Senate passes disaster aid bill after deal with Trump | Trump to offer B aid package for farmers | House votes to boost retirement savings | Study says new tariffs to double costs for consumers Overnight Energy: Democrats ask if EPA chief misled on vehicle emissions | Dem senators want NBC debate focused on climate change | 2020 hopeful John Delaney unveils T climate plan MORE (D-Mass.), was considered "largely socialist," while 26 percent said it was "largely capitalist." 

A majority of voters also said that free college tuition, championed by presidential candidate Sen. Bernie SandersBernie Sanders2020 Democrats join striking McDonald's workers Billionaire's M gift to Morehouse grads points way to student debt solution Poll: Nearly half of Clinton's former supporters back Biden MORE (I-Vt.), was "largely socialist." Seventy-five percent of registered voters referred to it that way, while 25 percent said it was "largely capitalist."

The survey results come as 2020 candidates work to brand themselves in the crowded Democratic primary field while also distinguishing themselves from other contenders.

Sanders, who ran in 2016, has referred to himself as a "democratic socialist" while fellow 2020 contender Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisCastro swears off donations from oil, gas, coal executives Harris leads California Democrats in condemning HUD immigrant housing policy Billionaire's M gift to Morehouse grads points way to student debt solution MORE (D-Calif.) has rejected the term, opting to instead refer to herself as a "progressive Democrat."

The Hill-HarrisX survey of 1,002 registered voters was conducted online from Feb. 23-24. The sampling margin of error is plus or minus 3.1 percentage points. 

— Julia Manchester