SPONSORED:

Poll: Majority says Barr's summary of Mueller report was 'largely accurate'

A majority of Americans says they believe Attorney General William BarrBill BarrTrump and advisers considering firing FBI director after election: WaPo Steele dossier source insists he is not Russian agent: 'It's slander' Voting rights group files suit against Trump, administration officials alleging voter intimidation MORE's four-page summary of special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerCNN's Toobin warns McCabe is in 'perilous condition' with emboldened Trump CNN anchor rips Trump over Stone while evoking Clinton-Lynch tarmac meeting The Hill's 12:30 Report: New Hampshire fallout MORE's final report on Russian election meddling was "largely accurate," according to a new Hill-HarrisX poll. 

Fifty-four percent said they believed the summary was "largely accurate," while 46 percent said it was "largely inaccurate." 

The survey revealed a deep partisan divide on the matter, with 72 percent of Republicans calling the summary largely accurate, and 61 percent of Democrats saying it was largely inaccurate. 

Barr released his summary of Mueller's findings late last month, writing that the special counsel did not find evidence of coordination or conspiracy between the Trump campaign and Moscow.

The attorney general also wrote that he and Deputy Attorney General Rod RosensteinRod RosensteinTrump turns his ire toward Cabinet members Ex-deputy attorney general says Justice Dept. 'will ignore' Trump's threats against political rivals The Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by Facebook - Trump's erratic tweets upend stimulus talks; COVID-19 spreads in White House MORE determined that the evidence was "not sufficient" to establish an obstruction of justice charge, despite Mueller not making a determination on that point. 

Barr has since released a redacted version of the report but has faced criticism for its rollout to the public. 

Democrats have slammed Barr's summary and a press conference he held before the report's release, calling it a public relations move designed to protect President TrumpDonald John TrumpJudge rules to not release Russia probe documents over Trump tweets Trump and advisers considering firing FBI director after election: WaPo Obama to campaign for Biden in Florida MORE

They have also slammed Barr's comments about the probe, saying they do not match up with what Mueller wrote in the report. 

The Hill-HarrisX survey was conducted on April 19-21 among 2,004 registered voters. The margin of error is plus or minus 2.2 percentage points. 

— Julia Manchester