Poll: 37 percent of Dems want Congress to move on from Russia-related Trump probes

Almost four in 10 Democratic voters want Congress to move on from its investigations into President TrumpDonald John TrumpThe Hill's Morning Report - White House, Congress: Urgency of now around budget GOP presses Trump to make a deal on spending Democrats wary of handing Trump a win on infrastructure MORE stemming from special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerSasse: US should applaud choice of Mueller to lead Russia probe MORE's report and instead focus on issues like health care and immigration, according to a new poll.

A Hill-HarrisX survey released Thursday, found that 37 percent of Democratic respondents wanted lawmakers to abandon the Russia-related probes and move on to policy matters that include infrastructure development. Sixty-three percent of party loyalists said congressional Democrats should continue with the investigations.

Those figures put Democratic voters at odds not just with Republicans but with independents as well.

Sixty-one percent of independents in the survey said they wanted Congress to move on from the Russia-related probes, as did 86 percent of Republicans.

"Democrats are really between a rock and a hard place right now — the rock being their base, that 40 percent who says, 'Yes, go after the guy' — and the hard place being those independents who they have to convince in the general election that they've done something other than go after the president," B.J. Martino, a Republican pollster and political consultant, said on Thursday's broadcast of Hill.TV's "What America's Thinking."

Among voters overall, 60 percent said the focus should be on policy matters, while 40 percent said they wanted further inquiries into Russia's involvement in the 2016 U.S. presidential election.

Younger voters -- adults under the age of 35 -- were the only age group with a majority saying congressional Democrats should keep digging on Russia.

Some left-leaning commentators have urged Democrats to keep investigating Trump while also trying to move ahead on policy, but that's not likely to work, Martino said.

"Even though legislators can multitask, the media really doesn't in terms of their focus and what they report on what Democrats are doing," he said. "If Democrats are embroiled in hearing after hearing, what do you think is going to lead the news?"

But public opinion about what congressional Democrats should emphasize could change as Americans become more aware of the details of the Mueller investigation, said Pia Nargundkar, a senior associate at the Democratic consulting firm ALG Research.

"It's still very early. Most voters haven't absorbed really what's in the report or what it means, how they view Trump based on it," she said on "What America's Thinking."

—Matthew Sheffield