Biden takes 32-point lead over Sanders in new 2020 poll

Former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenTrump agrees with Kim, rips Biden at Japan presser Trump 'personally thinks lots of good things will come from North Korea' Trump meets Japan's new emperor in lavish welcome ceremony MORE has a 32-point lead in the Democratic presidential race in a Hill-HarrisX poll released Monday.

Biden won 46 percent in the poll compared to 14 percent for Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersMillions of taxpayer dollars fueled Bernie Sanders to wealth success Robert Smith's gift to Morehouse graduates and its meaning for education, especially black colleges Democratic candidates should counter Trump's foreign policy MORE (I-Vt.), who came in a distant second place.

South Bend, Ind. mayor Pete ButtigiegPeter (Pete) Paul ButtigiegTeflon Joe? Biden brushes off attacks Buttigieg accuses Trump of 'slander against veterans' with comments about pardons Buttigieg: US 'policy has to be to avoid escalation in the Persian Gulf' MORE was in third place with 8 percent, followed by Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenMillions of taxpayer dollars fueled Bernie Sanders to wealth success Robert Smith's gift to Morehouse graduates and its meaning for education, especially black colleges Teflon Joe? Biden brushes off attacks MORE (D-Mass.) with 7 percent.

Since he officially entered the race in April, Biden has seen an increase in public support and become the clear frontrunner in the race.

Polls taken since the former vice president's official declaration have shown him receiving support in the upper 30s to lower 40s, about twice as much as Sanders, his next closest rival.

The poll was taken Friday and Saturday among 440 registered voters who identified as Democrats or independents who leaned toward the party.

California Democratic Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisSan Francisco police union calls on chief to resign over journalist raid Robert Smith's gift to Morehouse graduates and its meaning for education, especially black colleges Teflon Joe? Biden brushes off attacks MORE was fourth with 6 percent, followed by former Rep. Beto O'RourkeBeto O'RourkeO'Rourke: Trump 'provoking' war with Iran by sending troops to Middle East Buttiegieg backs NFL players' right to protest during anthem: I 'put my life on the line to defend' that Overnight Energy: Democrats ask if EPA chief misled on vehicle emissions | Dem senators want NBC debate focused on climate change | 2020 hopeful John Delaney unveils T climate plan MORE (D-Texas) and Sen. Cory BookerCory Anthony Booker2020 Democrats jockey over surging college costs Whip list: Who's clinched a spot in the 2020 Democratic debates 2020 Democrats target federal ban on abortion funding MORE (D-N.J.) with 3 percent each.

Rep. Tulsi GabbardTulsi GabbardDemocratic candidates should counter Trump's foreign policy 2020 Democrats jockey over surging college costs Whip list: Who's clinched a spot in the 2020 Democratic debates MORE (D-Hawaii), former HUD secretary Julian CastroJulian CastroDe Blasio pitches himself as tough New Yorker who can take on 'Don the con' Michael Bennet must find a way to stand out in the crowd Sandra Bland's sister: She's 'literally speaking for herself even beyond her grave' in video MORE, former Rep. John DelaneyJohn Kevin Delaney2020 Democrats jockey over surging college costs Whip list: Who's clinched a spot in the 2020 Democratic debates 2020 Democrats target federal ban on abortion funding MORE (D-Md.), Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten Elizabeth GillibrandDemocratic groups gear up to use abortion rights as attack on GOP in 2020 2020 Democrats jockey over surging college costs Whip list: Who's clinched a spot in the 2020 Democratic debates MORE (D-N.Y.), and Sen. Michael BennetMichael Farrand BennetWhip list: Who's clinched a spot in the 2020 Democratic debates DNC boss says candidates to be involved in debate lottery Overnight Energy: Democrats ask if EPA chief misled on vehicle emissions | Dem senators want NBC debate focused on climate change | 2020 hopeful John Delaney unveils T climate plan MORE (D-Colo.) received between 1 and 2 percent support.

Rep. Tim RyanTimothy (Tim) John Ryan2020 Democrats jockey over surging college costs Whip list: Who's clinched a spot in the 2020 Democratic debates CNN's O'Rourke town hall finishes behind Fox News, MSNBC MORE (D-Ohio), entrepreneur Andrew YangAndrew Yang2020 Democrats jockey over surging college costs Whip list: Who's clinched a spot in the 2020 Democratic debates Klobuchar to roll out policy priorities for farmers in Iowa MORE, author Marianne WilliamsonMarianne Williamson2020 Democrats target federal ban on abortion funding DNC boss says candidates to be involved in debate lottery Biden retains large lead over Sanders, other 2020 Dems in new Hill-HarrisX poll MORE, Gov. Jay InsleeJay Robert InsleeDemocratic candidates should counter Trump's foreign policy Whip list: Who's clinched a spot in the 2020 Democratic debates Overnight Energy: Democrats push EPA to collect 4K in 'excessive' Pruitt travel expenses | Greens angered over new rules for rocket fuel chemical | Inslee to join youth climate strikers in Las Vegas MORE (D-Washington), Rep. Eric SwalwellEric Michael Swalwell2020 Democrats jockey over surging college costs Whip list: Who's clinched a spot in the 2020 Democratic debates House Intelligence enjoys breakthrough with Justice Department MORE (D-Calif.), Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy Jean Klobuchar2020 Democrats jockey over surging college costs Democratic senator says McCain listed off names of dictators during Trump inaugural Whip list: Who's clinched a spot in the 2020 Democratic debates MORE (D-Minn.), former Gov. John HickenlooperJohn Wright Hickenlooper2020 Democrats jockey over surging college costs Whip list: Who's clinched a spot in the 2020 Democratic debates The Hill's Morning Report - Trump says no legislation until Dems end probes MORE (D-Colo.), and Wayne MessamWayne Martin MessamBiden retains large lead over Sanders, other 2020 Dems in new Hill-HarrisX poll Momentum builds behind push to pass laws enshrining abortion rights 'SleepyCreepy Joe' and 'Crazy Bernie': Trump seeks to define 2020 Dems with insults MORE, the mayor of Miramar, Florida, received between 0 and 1 percent support.

No respondents expressed support for Rep. Seth MoultonSeth Wilbur MoultonDemocratic candidates should counter Trump's foreign policy 2020 Democrats jockey over surging college costs Whip list: Who's clinched a spot in the 2020 Democratic debates MORE (D-Mass.) and former Sen. Mike Gravel (D-Alaska). Four percent of respondents named someone else. Respondents were not given an option to state that they were unsure or would not vote in a primary or caucus.

The vice president has strong name recognition and is likely being helped by his eight years as vice president to former President Obama, who remains popular with Democrats. 

"Biden has seen a little bit of a bump from his announcement, anywhere from 12 to 15 percentage points in most polls that I've seen," Mallory Newall, the director of research at Ipsos Public Affairs, said Monday on "What America's Thinking."

"I think his standing is strong at this point but again, you have to keep in mind that he is by far the best known in the race."

Conor Maguire, a Republican strategist, suggested the race could still turn, noting that the 2016 Republican presidential primary was completely upended by the unexpected candidacy of Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpDemocrats claim victory as Trump gets battered in court Juan Williams: Anti-abortion extremism is on the rise Trump feels squeeze in tax return fight MORE.

"This is a long, long primary," he told host Jamal Simmons. "At this point, Trump hadn't even made his ride down the escalator yet, so there's going to be a lot of things that are going to change and we're going to see how they move."

Biden's numbers may also have been helped by the fact that the survey question did not give respondents an option to say they were unsure who they supported or that they did not intend to vote in the Democratic presidential primary.

The latest Hill-HarrisX poll was conducted from an online panel of 1,002 statistically representative registered voters with a sampling margin of error of 3.1 percentage points and a confidence level of 95 percent. The Democratic preference question was asked of a 440-person subset of voters who identified as Democrats or independents who were inclined toward the party. The sampling margin of error for the subset is 4.7 percentage points.

—Matthew Sheffield