Biden takes 32-point lead over Sanders in new 2020 poll

Former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Airbnb - House to pass relief bill; Trump moves to get US back to work Democratic fears rise again as coronavirus pushes Biden to sidelines Sanders charges forward with 2020 bid despite long odds MORE has a 32-point lead in the Democratic presidential race in a Hill-HarrisX poll released Monday.

Biden won 46 percent in the poll compared to 14 percent for Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Airbnb - House to pass relief bill; Trump moves to get US back to work Oil price drop threatens US fracking boom Democratic fears rise again as coronavirus pushes Biden to sidelines MORE (I-Vt.), who came in a distant second place.

South Bend, Ind. mayor Pete ButtigiegPete ButtigiegReuters poll finds Sanders cutting Biden national lead to single digits Biden says he'll adopt plans from Sanders, Warren Buttigieg guest-hosts for Jimmy Kimmel: 'I've got nothing else going on' MORE was in third place with 8 percent, followed by Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenDemocratic senators call on FDA to drop restrictions on blood donations from men who have sex with men HuffPost reporter: Coronavirus rescue package designed for 'super rich' Schumer: Senate should 'explore' remote voting if coronavirus sparks lengthy break MORE (D-Mass.) with 7 percent.

Since he officially entered the race in April, Biden has seen an increase in public support and become the clear frontrunner in the race.

Polls taken since the former vice president's official declaration have shown him receiving support in the upper 30s to lower 40s, about twice as much as Sanders, his next closest rival.

The poll was taken Friday and Saturday among 440 registered voters who identified as Democrats or independents who leaned toward the party.

California Democratic Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisDemocratic senators call on FDA to drop restrictions on blood donations from men who have sex with men Harris knocks Gaetz for taking issue with money for Howard in relief package Biden's general election strategy comes into focus MORE was fourth with 6 percent, followed by former Rep. Beto O'RourkeBeto O'RourkeO'Rourke slams Texas official who suggested grandparents risk their lives for economy during pandemic Hispanic Caucus campaign arm unveils non-Hispanic endorsements Five Latinas who could be Biden's running mate MORE (D-Texas) and Sen. Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerLawmakers, labor leaders ramp up calls to use Defense Production Act Democratic senators call on FDA to drop restrictions on blood donations from men who have sex with men Amazon doubling overtime pay for warehouse workers MORE (D-N.J.) with 3 percent each.

Rep. Tulsi GabbardTulsi Gabbard20 House Dems call on Trump to issue two-week, nationwide shelter-in-place order The Hill's Morning Report — ,000,000,000,000: GOP unveils historic US rescue effort Gillibrand endorses Biden for president MORE (D-Hawaii), former HUD secretary Julian CastroJulian CastroMichael Bloomberg is not our savior The Hill's Campaign Report: Bloomberg to face off with rivals at Nevada debate How the media fall in and out of love with candidates MORE, former Rep. John DelaneyJohn DelaneyJohn Delaney endorses Biden Nevada caucuses open with a few hiccups Lobbying world MORE (D-Md.), Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandProgressive advocates propose T 'green stimulus' plan Juan Williams: Biden's promises on women are a big deal Cuomo steps into national spotlight with coronavirus fight MORE (D-N.Y.), and Sen. Michael BennetMichael Farrand BennetHillicon Valley: Facebook launches portal for coronavirus information | EU sees spike in Russian misinformation on outbreak | Senate Dem bill would encourage mail-in voting | Lawmakers question safety of Google virus website We need a massive economic response to counter the threat of the coronavirus Senator calls for cybersecurity review at health agencies after hacking incident MORE (D-Colo.) received between 1 and 2 percent support.

Rep. Tim RyanTimothy (Tim) RyanLawmakers call for universal basic income amid coronavirus crisis Democrats tear into Trump's speech: It was a 'MAGA rally' Democrats walk out of Trump's address: 'It's like watching professional wrestling' MORE (D-Ohio), entrepreneur Andrew YangAndrew YangSolving the coronavirus economic downturn — good psychology makes for good politics and policy Andrew Yang nonprofit to dole out checks to 500 households Senate GOP mulls forgivable loans to businesses to halt layoffs, bankruptcies MORE, author Marianne WilliamsonMarianne WilliamsonThe Hill's Campaign Report: Biden looks to stretch lead in Tuesday contests Pelosi: 'I usually always cast my vote for a woman' Pelosi: 'We'll have a woman president' someday MORE, Gov. Jay InsleeJay Robert InsleeTrump questions need for 30,000 ventilators in New York Hospitals pushed to limit as coronavirus cases rise The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Airbnb - Trump, Dems close in on deal MORE (D-Washington), Rep. Eric SwalwellEric Michael SwalwellKey House chairman cautions against remote voting, suggests other options amid coronavirus outbreak House Democrats plead with key committee chairman to allow remote voting amid coronavirus pandemic Congress tiptoes toward remote voting MORE (D-Calif.), Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharDemocratic senators call on FDA to drop restrictions on blood donations from men who have sex with men Senate Democrats vow to keep pushing for more funds for mail-in voting Klobuchar says her husband has been released from hospital, 'recovering at home' MORE (D-Minn.), former Gov. John HickenlooperJohn HickenlooperSenate GOP super PAC books more than million in fall ads Poll shows Daines, Bullock neck and neck in Montana Senate race Progressive challenger: How we overcame Chuck Schumer meddling MORE (D-Colo.), and Wayne MessamWayne Martin MessamKey moments in the 2020 Democratic presidential race so far Wayne Messam suspends Democratic presidential campaign 2020 primary debate guide: Everything you need to know ahead of the November forum MORE, the mayor of Miramar, Florida, received between 0 and 1 percent support.

No respondents expressed support for Rep. Seth MoultonSeth MoultonPressley experiencing flu-like symptoms, being tested for COVID-19 The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Airbnb - Senate overcomes hurdles, passes massive coronavirus bill Hoyer says House expects to pass coronavirus bill on Friday MORE (D-Mass.) and former Sen. Mike Gravel (D-Alaska). Four percent of respondents named someone else. Respondents were not given an option to state that they were unsure or would not vote in a primary or caucus.

The vice president has strong name recognition and is likely being helped by his eight years as vice president to former President Obama, who remains popular with Democrats. 

"Biden has seen a little bit of a bump from his announcement, anywhere from 12 to 15 percentage points in most polls that I've seen," Mallory Newall, the director of research at Ipsos Public Affairs, said Monday on "What America's Thinking."

"I think his standing is strong at this point but again, you have to keep in mind that he is by far the best known in the race."

Conor Maguire, a Republican strategist, suggested the race could still turn, noting that the 2016 Republican presidential primary was completely upended by the unexpected candidacy of Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpDefense industrial base workers belong at home during this public health crisis Maduro pushes back on DOJ charges, calls Trump 'racist cowboy' House leaders hope to vote Friday on coronavirus stimulus MORE.

"This is a long, long primary," he told host Jamal Simmons. "At this point, Trump hadn't even made his ride down the escalator yet, so there's going to be a lot of things that are going to change and we're going to see how they move."

Biden's numbers may also have been helped by the fact that the survey question did not give respondents an option to say they were unsure who they supported or that they did not intend to vote in the Democratic presidential primary.

The latest Hill-HarrisX poll was conducted from an online panel of 1,002 statistically representative registered voters with a sampling margin of error of 3.1 percentage points and a confidence level of 95 percent. The Democratic preference question was asked of a 440-person subset of voters who identified as Democrats or independents who were inclined toward the party. The sampling margin of error for the subset is 4.7 percentage points.

—Matthew Sheffield