Biden takes 32-point lead over Sanders in new 2020 poll

Former Vice President Joe BidenJoe Robinette BidenButtigieg on Trump tweets: 'I don't care' Buttigieg: The future 'is personal' for me Donald Trump, president for life? We need term limits now MORE has a 32-point lead in the Democratic presidential race in a Hill-HarrisX poll released Monday.

Biden won 46 percent in the poll compared to 14 percent for Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersButtigieg defends appearing on Fox News: Many Americans don't hear Dems' message Buttigieg: The future 'is personal' for me Donald Trump, president for life? We need term limits now MORE (I-Vt.), who came in a distant second place.

South Bend, Ind. mayor Pete ButtigiegPeter (Pete) Paul ButtigiegButtigieg jokes about holding town hall same night as 'Game of Thrones' finale Buttigieg defends appearing on Fox News: Many Americans don't hear Dems' message Buttigieg on Trump tweets: 'I don't care' MORE was in third place with 8 percent, followed by Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenButtigieg jokes about holding town hall same night as 'Game of Thrones' finale Buttigieg defends appearing on Fox News: Many Americans don't hear Dems' message Warren offers to help Twitter user with her love life MORE (D-Mass.) with 7 percent.

Since he officially entered the race in April, Biden has seen an increase in public support and become the clear frontrunner in the race.

Polls taken since the former vice president's official declaration have shown him receiving support in the upper 30s to lower 40s, about twice as much as Sanders, his next closest rival.

The poll was taken Friday and Saturday among 440 registered voters who identified as Democrats or independents who leaned toward the party.

California Democratic Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisButtigieg defends appearing on Fox News: Many Americans don't hear Dems' message De Blasio pitches himself as tough New Yorker who can take on 'Don the con' Buttigieg condemns 'voices on Fox' for spreading 'fear' and 'lies' ahead of town hall appearance MORE was fourth with 6 percent, followed by former Rep. Beto O'RourkeBeto O'RourkeTrump hits Fox News for 'wasting airtime' with coverage of Buttigieg Overnight Health Care — Presented by Campaign for Accountability — Momentum builds for federal laws enshrining abortion rights | Missouri lawmakers approve bill banning abortions at 8 weeks | Warren unveils plan to protect abortion rights Overnight Energy: Dems dismiss Interior chief's work calendars as 'fake' | Buttigieg climate plan includes carbon tax | Poll finds growing number say climate is crucial 2020 issue MORE (D-Texas) and Sen. Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerDe Blasio pitches himself as tough New Yorker who can take on 'Don the con' Sanders pledges to only nominate Supreme Court justices that support Roe v. Wade From dive bars to steakhouses: How Iowa caucus staffers blow off steam MORE (D-N.J.) with 3 percent each.

Rep. Tulsi GabbardTulsi GabbardGabbard says claim her campaign is getting boost from Putin apologists is 'fake news' Momentum builds behind push to pass laws enshrining abortion rights Poll: Biden is only Dem candidate that beats Trump outside of margin of error MORE (D-Hawaii), former HUD secretary Julian CastroJulian CastroDe Blasio pitches himself as tough New Yorker who can take on 'Don the con' Michael Bennet must find a way to stand out in the crowd Sandra Bland's sister: She's 'literally speaking for herself even beyond her grave' in video MORE, former Rep. John DelaneyJohn Kevin DelaneyMoulton rolls out plan to promote national service among young Americans From dive bars to steakhouses: How Iowa caucus staffers blow off steam Winter is here: How 'Game of Thrones' took over American politics MORE (D-Md.), Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten Elizabeth GillibrandGillibrand says she would not detain immigrants De Blasio pitches himself as tough New Yorker who can take on 'Don the con' Gillibrand: 'President Trump has started a war on American women' MORE (D-N.Y.), and Sen. Michael BennetMichael Farrand BennetDe Blasio pitches himself as tough New Yorker who can take on 'Don the con' Momentum builds behind push to pass laws enshrining abortion rights The Hill's Morning Report — Presented by Pass USMCA Coalition — Trump: GOP has `clear contrast' with Dems on immigration MORE (D-Colo.) received between 1 and 2 percent support.

Rep. Tim RyanTimothy (Tim) John RyanDe Blasio pitches himself as tough New Yorker who can take on 'Don the con' Momentum builds behind push to pass laws enshrining abortion rights Poll: Biden is only Dem candidate that beats Trump outside of margin of error MORE (D-Ohio), entrepreneur Andrew YangAndrew YangMomentum builds behind push to pass laws enshrining abortion rights Poll: Biden is only Dem candidate that beats Trump outside of margin of error Eye-popping number of Dems: I can beat Trump MORE, author Marianne WilliamsonMarianne WilliamsonMomentum builds behind push to pass laws enshrining abortion rights Poll: Biden is only Dem candidate that beats Trump outside of margin of error Eye-popping number of Dems: I can beat Trump MORE, Gov. Jay InsleeJay Robert InsleeDe Blasio pitches himself as tough New Yorker who can take on 'Don the con' Inslee gives public option first test in Washington state Overnight Energy: Dems dismiss Interior chief's work calendars as 'fake' | Buttigieg climate plan includes carbon tax | Poll finds growing number say climate is crucial 2020 issue MORE (D-Washington), Rep. Eric SwalwellEric Michael SwalwellDe Blasio pitches himself as tough New Yorker who can take on 'Don the con' Momentum builds behind push to pass laws enshrining abortion rights Swalwell pledges to appoint Supreme Court justices who defend Roe v. Wade MORE (D-Calif.), Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharKlobuchar: 'Don't think' there are reasons to investigate Mueller probe's origins Klobuchar: Trump plan doesn't deal with 'comprehensive immigration issue' Buttigieg condemns 'voices on Fox' for spreading 'fear' and 'lies' ahead of town hall appearance MORE (D-Minn.), former Gov. John HickenlooperJohn Wright HickenlooperDe Blasio pitches himself as tough New Yorker who can take on 'Don the con' 2020 hopeful Hickenlooper swipes at Dems on security, says Trump 'fueling national crisis of division' Inslee gives public option first test in Washington state MORE (D-Colo.), and Wayne MessamWayne Martin MessamMomentum builds behind push to pass laws enshrining abortion rights 'SleepyCreepy Joe' and 'Crazy Bernie': Trump seeks to define 2020 Dems with insults Michael Bennet must find a way to stand out in the crowd MORE, the mayor of Miramar, Florida, received between 0 and 1 percent support.

No respondents expressed support for Rep. Seth MoultonSeth Wilbur MoultonDe Blasio pitches himself as tough New Yorker who can take on 'Don the con' Moulton rolls out plan to promote national service among young Americans Moulton: Trump 'lacks the credibility' to keep US out of war with Iran MORE (D-Mass.) and former Sen. Mike Gravel (D-Alaska). Four percent of respondents named someone else. Respondents were not given an option to state that they were unsure or would not vote in a primary or caucus.

The vice president has strong name recognition and is likely being helped by his eight years as vice president to former President Obama, who remains popular with Democrats. 

"Biden has seen a little bit of a bump from his announcement, anywhere from 12 to 15 percentage points in most polls that I've seen," Mallory Newall, the director of research at Ipsos Public Affairs, said Monday on "What America's Thinking."

"I think his standing is strong at this point but again, you have to keep in mind that he is by far the best known in the race."

Conor Maguire, a Republican strategist, suggested the race could still turn, noting that the 2016 Republican presidential primary was completely upended by the unexpected candidacy of Donald Trump.

"This is a long, long primary," he told host Jamal Simmons. "At this point, Trump hadn't even made his ride down the escalator yet, so there's going to be a lot of things that are going to change and we're going to see how they move."

Biden's numbers may also have been helped by the fact that the survey question did not give respondents an option to say they were unsure who they supported or that they did not intend to vote in the Democratic presidential primary.

The latest Hill-HarrisX poll was conducted from an online panel of 1,002 statistically representative registered voters with a sampling margin of error of 3.1 percentage points and a confidence level of 95 percent. The Democratic preference question was asked of a 440-person subset of voters who identified as Democrats or independents who were inclined toward the party. The sampling margin of error for the subset is 4.7 percentage points.

—Matthew Sheffield