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Biden retains large lead over Sanders, other 2020 Dems in new Hill-HarrisX poll

Former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenFauci says school should be open 'full blast' five days a week in the fall Overnight Defense: Military sexual assault reform bill has votes to pass in Senate l First active duty service member arrested over Jan. 6 riot l Israeli troops attack Gaza Strip Immigration experts say GOP senators questioned DHS secretary with misleading chart MORE continues to lead an ever-growing pack of Democratic White House hopefuls, according to a Hill-HarrisX poll released Wednesday.

The May 17-18 survey found Biden was the preferred pick to become president of 33 percent of registered voters who identified as Democrats or as independents who leaned toward the party.

Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersStudy: Early unemployment cutoff would cost 16M people 0B Machine Gun Kelly reveals how Bernie Sanders aided him in his relationship with Megan Fox Overnight Health Care: CDC approves Pfizer vaccine for adolescents aged 12-15 | House moderates signal concerns with Pelosi drug pricing bill | Panel blasts COVID-19 response MORE (I-Vt.) was the choice of 14 percent of respondents. Massachusetts Democratic Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenWarren says Republican Party 'eating itself and it is discovering that the meal is poisonous' Briahna Joy Gray: Warren not endorsing Sanders in 2020 was 'really frustrating' McConnell hits Democratic critics of Israel MORE was named by 8 percent followed by mayor Pete ButtigiegPete ButtigiegBiden says he and GOP both 'sincere about' seeking infrastructure compromise The Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by Facebook - Colonial pays hackers as service is restored The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Biden expresses optimism on bipartisanship; Cheney ousted MORE and Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala HarrisImmigration experts say GOP senators questioned DHS secretary with misleading chart Carper urges Biden to nominate ambassadors amid influx at border Priest who presided over Biden's inaugural mass resigns from university post after investigation MORE (D-Calif.) both with 6 percent. Former Rep. Beto O'RourkeBeto O'RourkeO'Rourke clarifies remarks, leaves door open to gubernatorial bid O'Rourke says he's not planning on run for Texas governor O'Rourke slams Cruz for video of border visit MORE was backed by 5 percent of respondents.

None of the other candidates received more than 1 percent support. Several aspirants were not named by any participant: Gov. Steve BullockSteve BullockDemocratic Kansas City, Mo., mayor eyes Senate run Overnight Energy: Climate Summit Day 2 — Biden says US will work with other countries on climate innovation Biden announces picks to lead oceans, lands agencies MORE (D-Mont.), former Colorado Democratic Gov. John HickenlooperJohn HickenlooperDC statehood bill picks up Senate holdout Lobbying world DNC taps veteran campaign hands for communications staff MORE, Gov. Jay InsleeJay Robert InsleeWashington bans open carry of weapons at state capitol, public protests Washington state to provide free menstrual hygiene products in school bathrooms Cuomo signs legislation restoring voting rights to felons upon release from prison MORE (D-Washington), Rep. Eric SwalwellEric Michael SwalwellMcCarthy open to meeting officer injured on Jan. 6 after Swalwell claims he was 'hung up on' McCarthy brushes off questions about GOP lawmakers downplaying Jan. 6 violence GOP struggles to rein in nativism MORE (D-Calif.), former Sen. Mike Gravel (D-Alaska), Florida mayor Wayne MessamWayne Martin MessamKey moments in the 2020 Democratic presidential race so far Wayne Messam suspends Democratic presidential campaign 2020 primary debate guide: Everything you need to know ahead of the November forum MORE, and author Marianne WilliamsonMarianne WilliamsonMarianne Williamson: Refusal to hike minimum wage is part of 'rigged economy' Rush Limbaugh dead at 70 Marianne Williamson discusses America's "soulless ethos" MORE.

A large number of respondents, 19 percent, were undecided.

While she still trails the leading two candidates, Warren's support has increased across several different polls in recent weeks but it has come at Sanders' expense, Emma Vigeland, a correspondent with the progressive video network The Young Turks, told Hill.TV on Wednesday.

"Warren is rising and rightly so and she's cutting into that Bernie Sanders chunk which I believe is substantial and not going anywhere," she told "What America's Thinking" host Jamal Simmons.

Biden was more popular among women than among men. Thirty-nine percent of female respondents named the former vice president as their choice while 25 percent of male respondents said the same.

Sanders was the top choice for Democratic-leaning voters between the ages of 18 and 34 while Biden led among older age groups.

Nearly half of respondents (47 percent) who were 65 and older said the former veep was their choice. Biden was backed by 42 percent of participants between 50 and 64 and 35 percent of those between 35 and 49.

Among respondents who were 34 and younger, Sanders was the top pick of 24 percent. Thirteen percent chose Biden while 11 percent named Warren.

The former vice president fared better among respondents whose annual household income was $75,000 or greater than among those earning less than that amount.

Biden was preferred by 30 percent of respondents in the lower-income group and by 38 percent of respondents in the higher-income cohort.

Sanders was supported by 18 percent of Democratic-leaning voters with incomes less than $75,000 while only 8 percent of those earning more than this amount supported him.

The former vice president was the overwhelming favorite among respondents who classified themselves as "moderate" ideologically with 43 percent backing him. No other candidate received double-digit support from this group.

Biden was also the top pick among respondents who described themselves as politically liberal but by a much closer margin. Of the 221 participants who said they were either "strong" or "lean" liberals, the former veep was named by 28 percent while 17 percent named Sanders and 13 percent chose Warren.

Those findings echo earlier polls which indicate that Democratic voters place a much greater priority on defeating President TrumpDonald TrumpProject Veritas surveilled government officials to expose anti-Trump sentiments: report Cheney: Fox News has 'a particular obligation' to refute election fraud claims The Memo: What now for anti-Trump Republicans? MORE in 2020 than on ideological agreement. A May 10-11 Hill-HarrisX survey found that 65 percent of Democrats or independents who leaned toward the party said they would pick a candidate they believed had a stronger chance of winning the general election over one who agreed with them on their top policy issue.

A March USA Today-Suffolk University poll had similar findings, as did an April survey commissioned by a Pennsylvania newspaper of registered Democrats living in the state.

The latest Hill-HarrisX survey was conducted May 17-18 among a statistically representative online panel of 1,030 registered voters with a 95 percent confidence level and a sampling margin of error of 3.1 percentage points. The 2020 Democratic presidential preference question was asked of a subset of 448 respondents who identified as Democrats or as independents who favored the Democratic Party. The sampling margin of error for the subset is 4.6 percentage points.

—Matthew Sheffield