Biden retains large lead over Sanders, other 2020 Dems in new Hill-HarrisX poll

Former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenTrump denies telling Bolton Ukraine aid was tied to investigations Former senior Senate GOP aide says Republicans should call witnesses Title, release date revealed for Bolton memoir MORE continues to lead an ever-growing pack of Democratic White House hopefuls, according to a Hill-HarrisX poll released Wednesday.

The May 17-18 survey found Biden was the preferred pick to become president of 33 percent of registered voters who identified as Democrats or as independents who leaned toward the party.

Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersPoll: Sanders leads Biden by 9 points in Iowa Poll: Biden leads in Iowa ahead of caucuses The Memo: Impeachment dominates final Iowa sprint MORE (I-Vt.) was the choice of 14 percent of respondents. Massachusetts Democratic Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenPoll: Sanders leads Biden by 9 points in Iowa Poll: Biden leads in Iowa ahead of caucuses The Memo: Impeachment dominates final Iowa sprint MORE was named by 8 percent followed by mayor Pete ButtigiegPeter (Pete) Paul ButtigiegPoll: Sanders leads Biden by 9 points in Iowa Buttigieg on polarization: 'We don't have to choose between being bold and being unified' Buttigieg: America 'united in mourning' Kobe Bryant's death MORE and Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisBiden leads 2020 pack in congressional endorsements Harris on 2020 endorsement: 'I am not thinking about it right now' Panel: Is Kamala Harris a hypocrite for mulling a Joe Biden endorsement? MORE (D-Calif.) both with 6 percent. Former Rep. Beto O'RourkeBeto O'RourkeVeronica Escobar to give Spanish-language response to Trump State of the Union address Biden calls for revoking key online legal protection Trump mocks Booker over suspended presidential campaign MORE was backed by 5 percent of respondents.

None of the other candidates received more than 1 percent support. Several aspirants were not named by any participant: Gov. Steve BullockSteve BullockBrent Budowsky: Bloomberg should give billion to Democrats Key moments in the 2020 Democratic presidential race so far Kamala Harris dropped out, but let's keep her mental health plan alive MORE (D-Mont.), former Colorado Democratic Gov. John HickenlooperJohn HickenlooperFor a healthy aging workforce policy, look to Colorado Mitch McConnell may win the impeachment and lose the Senate Hickenlooper raised .8 million for Colorado Senate bid in fourth quarter of 2019 MORE, Gov. Jay InsleeJay Robert InsleeBloomberg, Steyer focus on climate change in effort to stand out Our government and public institutions must protect us against the unvaccinated Key moments in the 2020 Democratic presidential race so far MORE (D-Washington), Rep. Eric SwalwellEric Michael SwalwellMartha McSally fundraises off 'liberal hack' remark to CNN reporter Enes Kanter sees political stardom — after NBA and WWE Swalwell pens op-ed comparing Trump impeachment to XYZ Affair MORE (D-Calif.), former Sen. Mike Gravel (D-Alaska), Florida mayor Wayne MessamWayne Martin MessamKey moments in the 2020 Democratic presidential race so far Wayne Messam suspends Democratic presidential campaign 2020 primary debate guide: Everything you need to know ahead of the November forum MORE, and author Marianne WilliamsonMarianne WilliamsonMarianne Williamson says she supports Yang in Iowa caucuses Patrick backs reparations in unveiling 'Equity Agenda for Black Americans' Marianne Williamson drops out of 2020 race MORE.

A large number of respondents, 19 percent, were undecided.

While she still trails the leading two candidates, Warren's support has increased across several different polls in recent weeks but it has come at Sanders' expense, Emma Vigeland, a correspondent with the progressive video network The Young Turks, told Hill.TV on Wednesday.

"Warren is rising and rightly so and she's cutting into that Bernie Sanders chunk which I believe is substantial and not going anywhere," she told "What America's Thinking" host Jamal Simmons.

Biden was more popular among women than among men. Thirty-nine percent of female respondents named the former vice president as their choice while 25 percent of male respondents said the same.

Sanders was the top choice for Democratic-leaning voters between the ages of 18 and 34 while Biden led among older age groups.

Nearly half of respondents (47 percent) who were 65 and older said the former veep was their choice. Biden was backed by 42 percent of participants between 50 and 64 and 35 percent of those between 35 and 49.

Among respondents who were 34 and younger, Sanders was the top pick of 24 percent. Thirteen percent chose Biden while 11 percent named Warren.

The former vice president fared better among respondents whose annual household income was $75,000 or greater than among those earning less than that amount.

Biden was preferred by 30 percent of respondents in the lower-income group and by 38 percent of respondents in the higher-income cohort.

Sanders was supported by 18 percent of Democratic-leaning voters with incomes less than $75,000 while only 8 percent of those earning more than this amount supported him.

The former vice president was the overwhelming favorite among respondents who classified themselves as "moderate" ideologically with 43 percent backing him. No other candidate received double-digit support from this group.

Biden was also the top pick among respondents who described themselves as politically liberal but by a much closer margin. Of the 221 participants who said they were either "strong" or "lean" liberals, the former veep was named by 28 percent while 17 percent named Sanders and 13 percent chose Warren.

Those findings echo earlier polls which indicate that Democratic voters place a much greater priority on defeating President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump denies telling Bolton Ukraine aid was tied to investigations Former senior Senate GOP aide says Republicans should call witnesses Title, release date revealed for Bolton memoir MORE in 2020 than on ideological agreement. A May 10-11 Hill-HarrisX survey found that 65 percent of Democrats or independents who leaned toward the party said they would pick a candidate they believed had a stronger chance of winning the general election over one who agreed with them on their top policy issue.

A March USA Today-Suffolk University poll had similar findings, as did an April survey commissioned by a Pennsylvania newspaper of registered Democrats living in the state.

The latest Hill-HarrisX survey was conducted May 17-18 among a statistically representative online panel of 1,030 registered voters with a 95 percent confidence level and a sampling margin of error of 3.1 percentage points. The 2020 Democratic presidential preference question was asked of a subset of 448 respondents who identified as Democrats or as independents who favored the Democratic Party. The sampling margin of error for the subset is 4.6 percentage points.

—Matthew Sheffield