Biden maintains 19-point lead over Sanders in new poll

Former vice president Joe BidenJoe BidenTrump commutes Roger Stone's sentence Hillicon Valley: Facebook considers political ad ban | Senators raise concerns over civil rights audit | Amazon reverses on telling workers to delete TikTok House Democrat warns about 'inaccurate' polls: Trump voters 'fundamentally undercounted' MORE leads Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersTrump glosses over virus surge during Florida trip The Hill's Coronavirus Report: Fauci says focus should be on pausing reopenings rather than reverting to shutdowns; WHO director pleads for international unity in pandemic response Ex-Sanders aide says Biden unity task forces need to go farther MORE in the latest Hill-HarrisX poll released Monday by 19 points, maintaining a clear separation from the rest of the field in the Democratic presidential primary,

Biden won 35 percent support from Democratic and Democratic-leaning independent registered voters in the June 1-2 survey, compared to 16 percent for Sanders (I-Vt.).

South Bend, Ind. Mayor Pete ButtigiegPete ButtigiegBiden campaign hires top cybersecurity officials to defend against threats Biden strikes populist tone in blistering rebuke of Trump, Wall Street Buttigieg's new book, 'Trust,' slated for October release MORE was a distant third with 8 percent. He was followed by Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenDemocrats blast Trump for commuting Roger Stone: 'The most corrupt president in history' Pharma pricing is a problem, but antitrust isn't the (only) solution The Hill's Campaign Report: Democratic Unity Taskforce unveils party platform recommendations MORE (D-Mass) at 5 percent.

Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisHillicon Valley: Facebook considers political ad ban | Senators raise concerns over civil rights audit | Amazon reverses on telling workers to delete TikTok Senators raise concerns over Facebook's civil rights audit Biden's marijuana plan is out of step with public opinion MORE (D-Calif.) and former Rep. Beto O'RourkeBeto O'RourkeBellwether counties show trouble for Trump Colorado GOP Rep. Scott Tipton defeated in primary upset Clinton, Buttigieg among Democrats set to hold virtual events for Biden MORE were supported by 4 percent of respondents while Sen. Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerDemocrats blast Trump for commuting Roger Stone: 'The most corrupt president in history' Koch-backed group urges Senate to oppose 'bailouts' of states in new ads Data shows seven Senate Democrats have majority non-white staffs MORE (D-N.J.) was named by 3 percent.

All of the other Democratic candidates were named by 1 percent or fewer survey participants. Seventeen percent of respondents said they were unsure about their preference.

The results overall are largely similar to a May 17-18 Hill-HarrisX survey which also found Biden with a 19 percent lead over his Vermont-based rival. The former vice president received 33 percent support in the earlier poll while Sanders received 14 percent.

The May survey showed Warren in third place with 8 percent support and Buttigieg in fourth with 6 percent. The shift between the two candidates' support within the polls is within the surveys' sampling margins of error.

The newer poll found Biden as the top named candidate of both men and women and also across all age groups, although his lead over Sanders among voters between 18 and 34 was just one point, indicating a statistical tie. Older voters were overwhelmingly more likely to prefer the former vice president to other candidates with 47 percent of respondents 50 years old and older supporting him.

Among white voters, Biden was the preferred candidate while Sanders and Buttigieg were essentially tied for second-place. Biden enjoyed an even stronger lead among black respondents while Sanders showed strength among Hispanics although the sample size for both groups is too small to state this definitively.

Since Biden's entry into the presidential contest in April, the race has become relatively stable with no candidate able to dislodge Sanders from second-place and Biden from first, although that may change following the first debate contest which will be hosted by the Democratic National Committee June 26 and 27.

Presidential aspirants sharpened their messages over the weekend at the California Democratic Party's annual convention in San Francisco where several candidates called for impeaching President TrumpDonald John TrumpDemocrats blast Trump for commuting Roger Stone: 'The most corrupt president in history' Trump confirms 2018 US cyberattack on Russian troll farm Trump tweets his support for Goya Foods amid boycott MORE. Former Colorado Gov. John HickenlooperJohn Hickenlooper Senate outlook slides for GOP The Hill's Campaign Report: Colorado, Utah primary results bring upsets, intrigue The Hill's Morning Report - Republicans shift, urge people to wear masks MORE was booed by attendees after he expressed skepticism about a proposed Green New Deal environmental initiative and proposals to have the federal government administer medical insurance for all Americans.

Warren and Buttigieg took veiled swipes at Biden at the event with the Massachusetts senator implicitly denouncing his recent declarations that Republicans would become more inclined toward bipartisanship if President Trump is defeated in 2020. Buttigieg said that Democrats needed "a new generation of leaders," a reference to Biden's age of 76 years.

Sanders indirectly slammed Biden for skipping the event and argued that the party would not be able to defeat Trump unless it embraced a progressive agenda.

The latest Hill-HarrisX survey was conducted June 1-2 among a statistically representative sample of 1,001 registered voters. The question about 2020 Democratic presidential preference was asked of a subset of 431 respondents who said they were Democrats or independents who leaned toward the Democratic Party.

The larger survey has a 3.1 percent sampling margin of error and a 95 percent confidence level. The subset has a sampling margin of error of 4.7 percentage points.

—Matthew Sheffield