Poll: Over 60 percent of voters believe George Floyd's death was part of a larger pattern in policing

Sixty-three percent of voters believe the death of George Floyd, an unarmed black man who died while in Minneapolis police custody, was part of a larger pattern of how the police interact with people of color, a new Hill-HarrisX poll finds.

By contrast, 37 percent believed it was an isolated incident.

Eighty-six percent of black voters said Floyd's death was part of a larger pattern in policing, along with 71 percent of hispanic voters. 

The poll found white voters less likely to believe Floyd's death was part of a systemic issue. However, a majority still agreed that it was not an isolated incident, at 57 percent.

The June 12-14 survey also found large partisan gaps on this issue.

Eighty-three percent of Democrats believed what happened to Floyd was not an isolated incident, as well as 63 percent of independent voters.

However, 60 percent of Republican voters disagreed, believing it was an isolated incident.

"It's really two separate Americas right now I think is what this poll is showing," Director of Research at Ipsos, Mallory Newall, told Hill.TV.

"There's just a huge gap in your views on racial inequality and police treatment of people of color, especially black Americans, depending on your political affiliation," Newall added.

The Hill-HarrisX poll was conducted online among 2,834 registered voters between June 12 and 14. It has a margin of error of plus or minus 1.84 percentage points. 

Gabriela Schulte