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Poll: 53 percent of voters approve of Trump's handling on the economy

A majority of voters approve of President TrumpDonald John TrumpIvanka Trump, Jared Kusher's lawyer threatens to sue Lincoln Project over Times Square billboards Facebook, Twitter CEOs to testify before Senate Judiciary Committee on Nov. 17 Sanders hits back at Trump's attack on 'socialized medicine' MORE's handling of the economy and jobs, a new Hill-HarrisX poll finds.

Fifty-three percent of registered voters approve of Trump's handling on the economy while 54 percent approve of his handling on job stimulation, a result that has remained steady from a similar poll conducted July 24-26.

The survey found voters consistently give Trump higher marks on economic issues than other areas.

A recent Hill-HarrisX survey showed President Trump's job overall job approval at 48 percent while his approval on handling the coronavirus pandemic was 45 percent.

When comparing Trump and Democratic Presidential nominee Joe BidenJoe BidenFacebook, Twitter CEOs to testify before Senate Judiciary Committee on Nov. 17 Sanders hits back at Trump's attack on 'socialized medicine' Senate GOP to drop documentary series days before election hitting China, Democrats over coronavirus MORE, previous Hill-HarrisX data from a survey conducted in early July showed voters trusted Trump more on economic issues like growing the economy and creating new jobs, but trusted Biden more on economic inequality and lowering the deficit.

In that same poll, 42 percent of voters said they believed Trump is better at handling both the economy and new jobs while 36 percent said the same of Biden.

By contrast, 43 percent of voters said Biden would be better at handling economic inequality and 37 percent said Biden would be better at lowering the deficit.

Thirty-one percent said that Trump would be better at handling economic inequality, while 34 percent said the president would be better at lowering the deficit.

The Hill-HarrisX poll was conducted online among 2,804 registered voters between Sept. 18-21. It has a margin of error of plus or minus 1.9 percentage points. 

Gabriela Schulte