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Poll: 65 percent of voters say psychedelic substances do not have medical use

A majority of voters say psychedelic substances do not have medical uses, a new Hill-HarrisX poll finds.

Sixty-five percent of registered voters in the May 21-23 survey said psychedelic substances such as "magic mushrooms" do not have medical uses.

By contrast, more than a third of voters, 35 percent, said they think they do.

The survey found younger voters to be more likely to say psychedelic substances have medical uses.

Fifty-three percent of 18-29 year olds said "magic mushrooms" have medicinal benefits while majorities of voters 30 and older said they do not.

Democrats and independents were more likely to say psychedelic substances have medical uses, at 43 percent and 41 percent, respectively. Just 23 percent of Republican voters agreed.

The 2020 election saw several states ease restrictions on recreational drug use, including Oregon, which became the first state to legalize psilocybin, the active ingredient in so-called magic mushrooms, for mental health treatment in supervised settings.

The most recent Hill-HarrisX poll was conducted online among 1,899 registered voters. It has a margin of error of 2.25 percentage points.

Gabriela Schulte