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--> A midday take on what's happening in politics and how to have a sense of humor about it.*

*Ha. Haha. Hahah. Sniff. Haha. Sniff. Ha--breaks down crying hysterically. 

 

The Hill’s 12:30 Report: Senate panel votes to subpoena Twitter, Facebook, Google CEOs |  ‘Trump fatigue’ spells trouble |  Senate GOP frustrated after Tuesday’s debate |  Trump signs funding bill after short lapse | NYC becomes first big city to reopen all schools |  Five cursing parrots separated

 

LATEST WITH GOVERNMENT FUNDING

A teeny lapse in government funding:

 

 

Via The Hill’s Niv ElisPresident TrumpDonald John TrumpIvanka Trump, Jared Kusher's lawyer threatens to sue Lincoln Project over Times Square billboards Facebook, Twitter CEOs to testify before Senate Judiciary Committee on Nov. 17 Sanders hits back at Trump's attack on 'socialized medicine' MORE signed the government funding bill, shortly after midnight, to avert a government shutdown. https://bit.ly/3jj8ujm

Meaning: There was a very brief lapse in government funding.

What that meant for agencies: “The White House told agencies not to shut down despite the fact that legal funding ran out at midnight because Trump was expected to sign it quickly upon his return, as Politico first reported.”

Why it was signed after midnight: “Trump did not sign the bill, which passed in the House last week and in the Senate on Wednesday, until after returning from a rally in Minnesota after midnight.”  

How long the bill extends government funding: Until Dec. 11

It’s Thursday. It is officially October! I’m Cate Martel with a quick recap of the morning and what’s coming up. Send comments, story ideas and events for our radar to cmartel@thehill.com — and follow along on Twitter @CateMartel and Facebook.

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NEWS THIS MORNING

Trump proposes a low refugee cap:

President Trump is proposing that only 15,000 refugees be allowed to resettle in the U.S. in the next fiscal year, marking an historic low of admission for some of the world’s most vulnerable peoples.” https://bit.ly/3l8u4HP

 

 

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Aviation Workers Keep U.S. Safe, Connected

 

 

Aviation accounts for five percent of the nation’s GDP, supporting millions of jobs across U.S. industries, including manufacturing, hospitality, tourism, engineering and national defense. Learn more.

 

 

IN CONGRESS

You get a subpoena! And you get a subpoena! Subpoenas all around!:

The Senate Commerce Committee voted to subpoena the CEOs of Facebook, Google and Twitter. https://bit.ly/36p0j1m 

Why: “[Committee Chairman Roger WickerRoger Frederick WickerBipartisan group of senators call on Trump to sanction Russia over Navalny poisoning Senate Republicans offer constitutional amendment to block Supreme Court packing Government efforts to 'fix' social media bias overlooks the destruction of our discourse MORE (R-Miss.)] made it clear during Thursday’s executive business meeting that the hearing is required because of allegations of anti-conservative bias on their platforms.”

Why Senate Republicans are having a bad week:

 

 

Via The Hill’s Alexander Bolton, “Senate Republicans, who are battling to cling to their fragile majority, were left frustrated and gloomy after Tuesday night’s chaotic debate between President Trump and Democratic nominee Joe BidenJoe BidenFacebook, Twitter CEOs to testify before Senate Judiciary Committee on Nov. 17 Sanders hits back at Trump's attack on 'socialized medicine' Senate GOP to drop documentary series days before election hitting China, Democrats over coronavirus MORE that left them talking about controversies they had hoped to put behind them.” https://bit.ly/36olSik

Why the timing was bad for the GOP: “Tuesday night's debate was a comedown for many Republicans who were flying high after the Senate GOP conference quickly unified behind Trump’s Supreme Court pick. Instead of spending Wednesday touting nominee Amy Coney Barrett, they spent the day fielding questions about the president’s refusal to directly rebuke white supremacist groups or to commit to a peaceful transfer of power.”  

Op-ed: https://bit.ly/3ngmcpF

ON THE CAMPAIGN TRAIL

What do Americans think of all the drama?:

Via The Hill’s Niall Stanage, “Tuesday night’s presidential debate drew bad reviews from across the political and media spectrum. Trump’s conduct — interrupting frequently, arguing with the moderator and making highly personalized attacks on his Democratic opponent, Joe Biden — was widely criticized as boorish.” https://bit.ly/3jfZKdH

The problem for the president: “It is the latest in a long line of controversies. Other recent Trump furors have centered on disparaging remarks he is alleged to have made about troops killed in battle and the extraordinarily small amounts he has paid in federal income tax in recent years. The danger for Trump may be that his abrasive personality — seen, particularly by heartland conservative voters, as a bracing blast of anti-establishment air in 2016 — has worn thin.”

How this could play outhttps://bit.ly/3jfZKdH

HOW TRUMP UPENDS HIS OWN MESSAGING WITH BLACK VOTERS:

Via The Hill’s Marty Johnsonhttps://bit.ly/30oUcX4

LATEST WITH THE CORONAVIRUS

Coronavirus cases in the U.S.: 7,237,043 

U.S. death toll: 207,008 

Breakdown of the numbershttps://cnn.it/2UAgW3y

New York City is reopening its school doors:

Via The New York Times’s Eliza Shapiro, “New York Becomes the First Big City to Reopen All Its Schools: It’s a significant moment for the recovery in a city hit hard by the pandemic in the spring. The system, the nation’s largest, is welcoming back 500,000 students.” https://nyti.ms/30mO0yy

 

SPONSORED CONTENT — ALPA

Aviation Workers Keep U.S. Safe, Connected

 

 

Aviation accounts for five percent of the nation’s GDP, supporting millions of jobs across U.S. industries, including manufacturing, hospitality, tourism, engineering and national defense. Learn more.

 

NOTABLE TWEETS:

Yikes:

 

 

Hyperlink https://bit.ly/3l9IG9X 

The full storyhttps://cbsloc.al/36oYrpc

Wow, this is stunning:

 

 

Watchhttps://bit.ly/30q33ro

ON TAP:

The House and Senate are in. President Trump is in New Jersey today. Vice President Pence is in Iowa.

10:15 a.m. EDT: Vice President Pence left for Carter Lake, Iowa.

12:45 p.m. EDT: President Trump leaves for Bedminster, N.J.

1 p.m. EDT: A roll-call vote in the Senate. The Senate’s full agenda todayhttps://bit.ly/2HQGo17

1:15 p.m. EDT: Vice President Pence speaks at a campaign event in Carter Lake.

2:30 p.m. EDT at the earliest: The House votes. The House’s full agenda todayhttps://bit.ly/2Si6BaO 

3 p.m. EDT: President Trump holds a roundtable with supporters. 

3:45 p.m. EDT: President Trump speaks at a private fundraising committee reception in Bedminster. 

6:30 p.m. EDT: President Trump returns to the White House. 

9:15 p.m. EDT: Vice President Pence lands in Washington, D.C.

WHAT TO WATCH:

11 a.m. EDT: White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany held a press briefing. Livestreamhttps://bit.ly/34ikF9w

1 p.m. EDT: The House Rules Committee holds a hearing on possible changes for the next Congress. Livestreamhttps://cs.pn/3l82KZZ 

4:20 p.m. EDT: Vice President Pence speaks at an event in Des Moines, Iowa, “Faith in Leadership: The Need for Revival.” Livestreamhttps://bit.ly/3kXfHG2 

7 p.m. EDTPresident Trump and Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden speak at the annual Alfred E. Smith Memorial Foundation Dinner. Livestreamhttps://cs.pn/2G8fxNz

NOW FOR THE FUN STUFF...:

Today is National Pumpkin Spice Day. How festive.

Ahh hahahaha: 

A British zoo has separated five parrots who have been egging each other on to curse. https://cbsn.ws/3ijN2tb

Amazing: “With the five, one would swear and another would laugh and that would carry on," the center's chief executive, Steve Nichols said.  

"I'm hoping they learn different words within colonies. But if they teach the others bad language and I end up with 250 swearing birds, I don't know what we'll do."

The full story (plus photos): I promise it will make you smile. https://cbsn.ws/3ijN2tb

And to leave you on a good note, here’s a dog meditating: https://bit.ly/3n8NVsg