Boehner, Pelosi huddle ahead of funding showdown

Boehner, Pelosi huddle ahead of funding showdown
© Greg Nash
Speaker John BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerLobbying world A new kind of hero? Last week's emotional TV may be a sign GOP up in arms over Cheney, Kinzinger MORE (R-Ohio) and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) met Thursday to discuss a government funding bill, aides said. 
 
The meeting to discuss a continuing resolution to keep the government funded lasted for about 20 minutes and comes as an Oct. 1 deadline to fund the government and avoid a shutdown looms. 
 
The meeting was first reported by Politico.

Pelosi said after the meeting that the pair talked about the level of the spending bill. 

"We don’t have a number right now," she said. "But, we talked about how we would arrive at a number."
 
She said she preferred that a continuing resolution be "shorter-term" than Republicans' idea of one lasting through mid-December. "Why should we put it off?" she said. 
 
She said she was optimistic that Congress could avoid a shutdown. "I’m optimistic that saner heads will prevail, and we will have no shutdown of Government, and we will form an agreement to go forth — to include jobs, promote growth, and meet the needs of the American people," she said.
 
 
Democrats have long been pressing Republican leaders to start negotiations. Before this meeting, though, Pelosi had said only that she had spoken with Boehner about what they would talk about and had not had substantive talks.
 
Boehner is trying to figure out how to avoid a shutdown, as 31 conservative Republican lawmakers have vowed not to vote for any spending bill that includes Planned Parenthood funds. Getting Democratic votes for a spending bill could be the answer, though it poses risks for Boehner.
 
Pelosi also met with President Obama and Senate Minority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidTo Build Back Better, we need a tax system where everyone pays their fair share Democrats say Biden must get more involved in budget fight Biden looks to climate to sell economic agenda MORE (D-Nev.) at the White House on Thursday. The three want to pass a clean stopgap bill to avert a government shutdown and allow negotiators more time to reach a long-term budget deal.