US asks UN to respond to Iran supplying missiles to Yemeni rebels

US asks UN to respond to Iran supplying missiles to Yemeni rebels
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U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki HaleyNimrata (Nikki) HaleyNikki Haley blasts Roy Moore's Senate bid: 'He does not represent our Republican Party' Trump UN nominee: Climate change poses 'real risks' The Hill's Morning Report - Trump's reelection message: Promises kept MORE on Tuesday accused Iran of violating international law by supplying ballistic missiles to Yemeni rebels and called on the U.N. to respond.

Information recently released by Saudi Arabia shows a missile launched into the country in July by Yemen’s Houthi rebels was an Iranian Qiam, a type of weapon not previously present in Yemen.

“By providing these types of weapons to the Houthi militias in Yemen, Iran’s Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps is violating two UN resolutions simultaneously,” Haley said in a statement. “We encourage the release of any information that will help to hold Iran accountable for its support of violence and terrorism in the region and the world.”

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Saudi Arabia backs the government in neighboring Yemen while Iran has allied itself with the rebel Houthis.

A separate missile, intercepted Saturday in Riyadh, may also be of Iranian origin, Haley said.

Haley blasted Iran for its “complete disregard for its international obligations,” and called on the U.N. to “take necessary action to hold the Iranian regime accountable for these violations.”

“The United States is committed to containing Iran’s destabilizing actions and will not turn a blind eye to these serious violations of international law by the Iranian regime,” Haley said.

Relations with Iran have been a source of division within the Trump administration.

President Trump has declared the Iran nuclear deal, negotiated by the Obama administration, is no longer in the best interest of the United States and called on Congress to pass new benchmarks Iran needs to meet to avoid sanctions in the future. 

Secretary of State Rex TillersonRex Wayne TillersonLeaked Trump transition vetting documents show numerous officials with 'red flags': Axios Bolton says Russia, China seeking to promote discord in Trump administration Trump's nastiest break-ups: A look at the president's most fiery feuds MORE has said and said he believes staying in the deal is in the best interests of the United States.