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Sarah Palin on sexual harassment: 'People know I'm probably packing' so they 'don't mess with me'

Sarah Palin (R) on Thursday condemned sexual harassment in the workplace, adding that she has not personally experienced it because people know she carries a weapon. 

An MSNBC reporter stopped the former Alaska governor and Republican vice presidential candidate in the Capitol, where she was meeting with Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulPaul to Saudi government: 'It takes a lot of damn gall' to lecture US Congress raises pressure on Saudi Arabia The Hill's 12:30 Report — Trump says he is cutting foreign aid over caravan | Lawmakers point fingers at Saudi crown prince | DNC chair downplays 'blue wave' talk MORE (R-Ky).

"I think a whole lot of people know I'm probably packing so I don't think there's a whole lot of people who would necessarily mess with me,” Palin said.

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“I don’t mean to be lighthearted, this is a serious issue,” Palin continued. “It really stinks for women in the workplace that for too long, men have thought they can get away with that old-school thinking that it’s okay to belittle and harass women.”

Palin’s comments come just hours after Sen. Al FrankenAlan (Al) Stuart FrankenElection Countdown: Takeaways from heated Florida governor's debate | DNC chief pushes back on 'blue wave' talk | Manchin faces progressive backlash | Trump heads to Houston rally | Obama in Las Vegas | Signs of huge midterm turnout Dem holds single-digit lead in race to replace Franken GOP lawmaker once belittled sexual harassment: 'How traumatizing was it?' MORE (D-Minn.) was accused of sexually harassing radio anchor Leeann Tweeden in 2006. 

Franken is the first sitting senator to be accused of sexual harassment, but discussion of similar incidents have been ramping up in Hollywood, the political world and other industries.

Two female lawmakers introduced legislation this week to overhaul Congressional policies that deal with sexual harassment and assault, and several lawmakers have come forward with stories of being harassed on Capitol Hill.

“It’s not a partisan issue,” Palin said Thursday. “When we see this happening today, I think it leads to a lot of questions about what standards are going to be applied to whom.”

Multiple lawmakers from both parties, including Franken himself, called Thursday for an ethics investigation into his behavior.

Palin warned that as sexual harassment accusations mount, people should be wary of potentially false allegations.

“The floodgates are really open right now,” she said. “That could lead to a lot of false accusations that really harm an innocent person.”