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Bernie Sanders says felons should be able to vote while in prison

Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersThe Hill's 12:30 Report: Next steps in the Trump impeachment Sanders selling sweatshirts with his famous inauguration pose for charity Former Sanders spokesperson: Biden 'backing away' from 'populist offerings' MORE (I-Vt.) this weekend reportedly called for more states to join Vermont and Maine in allowing imprisoned felons to vote.

"I think that is absolutely the direction we should go," Sanders said at a town hall in Muscatine, Iowa, when asked if more states should extend the vote to felons currently behind bars, according to the Des Moines Register.

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"In my state, what we do is separate. You’re paying a price, you committed a crime, you’re in jail. That's bad," he said. "But you’re still living in American society and you have a right to vote.

"I believe in that, yes, I do.”

Sanders’s fellow presidential candidate, Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenOVERNIGHT ENERGY: Biden's Interior Department temporarily blocks new drilling on public lands | Group of GOP senators seeks to block Biden moves on Paris, Keystone | Judge grants preliminary approval for 0M Flint water crisis settlement Senate approves waiver for Biden's Pentagon nominee House approves waiver for Biden's Pentagon nominee MORE (D-Mass.), said recently that she endorsed enfranchising felons who have served their sentence, but did not go as far as the Vermont senator regarding voting rights for those currently behind bars, the newspaper noted.

"While they’re incarcerated, I think that’s something we can have more conversation about," she said in Storm Lake, Iowa, according to the Register.

Iowa, along with Kentucky, is currently one of two states in which felons can only vote with the governor’s permission, according to the newspaper. In late March, the state House passed an amendment endorsed by Gov. Kim Reynolds (R) that would automatically re-enfranchise felons once their sentences are complete but the measure was voted down by the state Senate, it added.

Sanders pulled out an unexpected win in the 2016 Iowa caucuses ahead of eventual Democratic nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonTexas Supreme Court rejects Alex Jones request to toss lawsuits from Sandy Hook parents Paris Agreement: Biden's chance to restore international standing Samantha Power's Herculean task: Turning a screw with a rubber screwdriver MORE.

He finished behind former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenMcCarthy says he told Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene he disagreed with her impeachment articles against Biden Biden, Trudeau agree to meet next month Fauci infuriated by threats to family MORE, who has yet to officially announce his candidacy, in a poll of likely caucusgoers in Iowa released last week.