Iowa becomes first state to permanently allow cocktails to go

Iowa becomes first state to permanently allow cocktails to go
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Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds (R ) signed legislation Monday that permanently allows cocktails to go, making it the first state to keep a temporary measure put in place in response to the coronavirus pandemic.

The bill, which the Iowa state House and Senate passed earlier this month, will change the Iowa Code to allow bars to sell any alcohol beverages for takeout and delivery, The Des Moines Register reported. It makes permanent Reynolds’s proclamation when restaurants and bars closed this spring allowing people to take out cocktails for off-premise consumption.

The Distilled Spirits Council of the United States (DISCUS) applauded the move, noting that Iowa’s hospitality businesses has suffered during the pandemic. 

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“Making cocktails to-go permanent provides a much-needed source of stability and revenue for local bars, restaurants and distilleries as they begin to recover,” Dale Szyndrowski, DISCUS vice president of state government relations, said in a press release. “Iowa is leading the way and serving as a model for other states looking for innovative ways to boost struggling hospitality businesses.”

More than 30 states and D.C. have allowed restaurants or bars to sell cocktails to go during restrictions due to the virus.

New York state led the charge in March, allowing restaurants to add beer, wine and spirits to takeout and delivery. New York Gov. Andrew CuomoAndrew CuomoNew York adds three more states' travelers to growing list for quarantine order NY state lawmaker introduces bill to require police officers get personal liability insurance The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Miami pauses reopenings as COVID-19 infections rise, schools nationally plot return MORE (D), along with several other governors, also deemed liquor stores “essential” businesses, allowing them to remain open.

Texas, Florida, Ohio, Oklahoma and Washington, D.C. are now considering making temporary policies permanent, according to DISCUS.

The temporary policies led to Drizly, an alcohol delivery company, seeing huge growth during the pandemic.