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Republicans: Dems threatening move to end Kavanaugh hearing early

Republicans: Dems threatening move to end Kavanaugh hearing early
© Greg Nash

The final day of questioning of President TrumpDonald John TrumpFederal watchdog accuses VOA parent company of wrongdoing under Trump appointee Lawsuit alleges 200K Georgia voters were wrongly purged from registration list Ivanka Trump gives deposition in lawsuit alleging misuse of inauguration funds MORE’s Supreme Court nominee may be cut short Thursday.

Senate Judiciary Chairman Sen. Chuck GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleyGrassley suggests moderate Democrats for next Agriculture secretary Democrats eye Dec. 11 exit for House due to COVID-19 A need for reauthorization of the Elder Justice Act MORE (R-Iowa) said Democrats had invoked a Senate rule to end Brett Kavanaugh's confirmation hearing. 

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"I've been told that the Senate minority leader or someone on the Democratic Party has invoked the two-hour rule. So, if the two-hour rule is invoked nobody on this committee is going to have an opportunity to do what they want to do today," Grassley said. 

"It’s the last day he’s going to be here and so I hope you don’t invoke the two-hour rule."

Under the Senate rules, committees can't hold hearings for more than two hours while the Senate is in session without unanimous consent. 

The Senate comes into session at noon. If Democrats invoke the two-hour rule, the committee would have to break up its hearing by about 2 p.m.   

Grassley said the minority would likely object to Republican's request for unanimous consent for the committee to continue its work.

A spokesperson for Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerPelosi, Schumer endorse 8 billion plan as basis for stimulus talks Funding bill hits snag as shutdown deadline looms Trump supporters could hand Senate control to Democrats MORE (D-N.Y.) told The Hill, "Stay tuned."

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellHillicon Valley: GOP chairman says defense bill leaves out Section 230 repeal | Senate panel advances FCC nominee | Krebs says threats to election officials 'undermining democracy' On The Money: Funding bill hits snag as shutdown deadline looms | Pelosi, Schumer endorse 8 billion plan as basis for stimulus talks | Poll: Most Americans support raising taxes on those making at least 0K Nearly one-third of US adults expect to lose employment income: Census Bureau MORE (R-Ky.) could adjourn the Senate sessions to get around the rule and allow the hearing to continue.

Democrats forced Republicans to adjourn Wednesday to protest Republicans' withholding of documents relating to Kavanaugh’s time in the White House under George W. Bush.

Jordain Carney contributed.