McConnell warns Senate it could work through Christmas break

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellFurious Republicans prepare to rebuke Trump on Syria Republicans wrestle with impeachment strategy Mattis warns 'ISIS will resurge' without U.S. pressure on Syria MORE (R-Ky.) on Tuesday warned that the Senate will be in session between Christmas and New Year's to finish their work unless senators agree to fast-track some items on their to-do list.

"Members should now be prepared to work between Christmas and New Year's, if necessary, to complete our work," McConnell said from the Senate floor. 

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He added that without an agreement among senators to speed up the time it takes to work through a piece of legislation it is "virtually certain" they will need to stay in Washington.

"Unless we approach all this work in a highly collaborative, productive way and take real advantage of unanimous consent to expedite proceedings, it is virtually certain that the Senate will need to be in session between Christmas and New Year's in order to complete this work," McConnell added.

It would be the second time the chamber delayed its end-of-year working deadline. The Senate had initially been expected to leave town on Dec. 14. That date got pushed back to Dec. 21 after Congress passed a two-week bill to fund part of the government.

McConnell, explaining why the Senate might need to stay in session longer, ticked off a lengthy list that remains before the chamber, including confirming nominees, passing a massive farm bill, an unwieldy fight over Yemen and preventing a partial government shutdown on Dec. 21.

"In just a few hours from now ... we will receive an indication of whether that cooperation will begin to take shape. My friend, the Democratic leader, and his counterpart in the House are scheduled to meet with President TrumpDonald John TrumpWHCA calls on Trump to denounce video depicting him shooting media outlets Video of fake Trump shooting members of media shown at his Miami resort: report Trump hits Fox News's Chris Wallace over Ukraine coverage MORE at the White House later today," McConnell said, referring to the meeting between Trump, Senate Democratic Leader Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerTrump defends 'crime buster' Giuliani amid reported probe Louisiana voters head to the polls in governor's race as Trump urges GOP support Trump urges Louisiana voters to back GOP in governor's race then 'enjoy the game' MORE (N.Y.) and House Democratic Leader Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiBiden on impeachment: 'I'm the only reason' it's happening Democrats to offer resolution demanding Trump reverse Syria decision Rand Paul calls for probe of Democrats over Ukraine letter MORE (Calif.). 

He added that he hoped Schumer and Pelosi "are prepared to have a serious discussion and reach an accommodation with the president on funding for border security." 

Both sides are far apart on funding for the border.

Republicans and the White House are demanding $5 billon — a number in line with the House's Department of Homeland Security (DHS) bill. Democrats are prepared to offer $1.3 billion as part of a one-year stopgap bill for DHS, while wrapping the other remaining six bills into one package. 

In a surprise move, McConnell also announced that the Senate will take up a criminal justice bill that merges a House-passed prison reform effort with four changes to sentencing laws.

"At the request of the president and following improvements to the legislation that has been secured by several members, the Senate will take up the recently revised criminal justice bill," McConnell said from the Senate floor. 

The bill has broad support in the Senate but has run into vocal opposition from a group of Republican senators. 

Sen. Tom CottonThomas (Tom) Bryant CottonBipartisan senators want federal plan for sharing more info on supply chain threats On The Money: Fed officials saw rising risk of recession | Ocasio-Cortez, Cruz blast NBA for 'outrageous' response to China | Prospects dim for trade breakthrough with China Ocasio-Cortez, Ted Cruz join colleagues blasting NBA for 'outrageous' response to China MORE (R-Ark.), who is deeply opposed to the criminal justice bill, warned on Friday that trying to move the measure as part of the year-end spending bill would guarantee senators had to work on Christmas.

"If the jailbreak bill gets stuck in the spending bill, everyone bring your stockings to the Senate, because we’ll be there on Christmas!" he said in a tweet.

Updated at 10:43 a.m.