Obama set to brief congressional leaders on Libya situation

President Obama will brief members of Congress on Friday afternoon on the situation in Libya just before he addresses the nation.

The White House announced Friday that Obama has invited a bipartisan group of lawmakers to the Situation Room to consult on Libya. Obama is scheduled to deliver a statement to the public at 2 p.m.

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The meeting follows the United Nations decision Thursday to impose a no-fly zone and other military measures aimed at stopping Col. Moammar Gadhafi from violently quashing a rebellion against his leadership.

Among those expected to participate are: House Speaker John BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerLobbying world A new kind of hero? Last week's emotional TV may be a sign GOP up in arms over Cheney, Kinzinger MORE (R-Ohio), Majority Leader Eric CantorEric Ivan CantorBottom line Virginia GOP candidates for governor gear up for convention Cantor: 'Level of craziness' in Washington has increased 'on both sides' MORE (R-Va.), Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.), Minority Whip Steny Hoyer (D-Md.), Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidDemocrats say Biden must get more involved in budget fight Biden looks to climate to sell economic agenda Justice Breyer issues warning on remaking Supreme Court: 'What goes around comes around' MORE (D-Nev.), Minority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellTrump seeking challenger to McConnell as Senate GOP leader: report Budget chairman: Debt ceiling fight 'a ridiculous position to be in' Buckle up for more Trump, courtesy of the Democratic Party MORE (R-Ky.) and Sens. Dick Lugar (R-Ind.), Saxby ChamblissClarence (Saxby) Saxby ChamblissEffective and profitable climate solutions are within the nation's farms and forests Live coverage: Georgia Senate runoffs Trump, Biden face new head-to-head contest in Georgia MORE (R-Ga.), Dick DurbinDick DurbinSenate parliamentarian nixes Democrats' immigration plan Manchin keeps Washington guessing on what he wants Democrats hope Biden can flip Manchin and Sinema MORE (D-Ill.), Jon Kyl (R-Ariz.), John KerryJohn Kerry Overnight Energy & Environment — Presented by Climate Power — Interior returns BLM HQ to Washington Biden confirms 30 percent global methane reduction goal, urges 'highest possible ambitions' 9/11 and US-China policy: The geopolitics of distraction MORE (D-Mass.) and Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinRepublicans caught in California's recall trap F-35 fighter jets may fall behind adversaries, House committee warns Warren, Daines introduce bill honoring 13 killed in Kabul attack MORE (D-Calif.).
 
Also scheduled to attend are Ileana Ros-Lehtinen (R-Fla.), Howard Berman (D-Calif.), Mike Rogers (R-Mich.) and Dutch Ruppersberger (D-Md.).

Some lawmakers have already left Washington and will participate in the briefing by phone.

A White House official said Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainBiden falters in pledge to strengthen US alliances 20 years after 9/11, US foreign policy still struggles for balance What the chaos in Afghanistan can remind us about the importance of protecting democracy at home MORE (R-Ariz.) had been invited but could not participate. The official did not know if Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamSenate parliamentarian nixes Democrats' immigration plan The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by National Industries for the Blind - Tight security for Capitol rally; Biden agenda slows Trump offers sympathy for those charged with Jan. 6 offenses MORE (R-S.C.) had been invited.

Gadhafi’s forces have retaken towns that fell to rebels over the past week, and the Libyan dictator on Thursday warned of an assault on the city of Benghazi, the last stronghold of his opponents.

On Friday, in response to the UN resolution, Gadhafi reportedly ordered a ceasefire in Libya, one of the conditions of the resolution.

But Secretary of State Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonClinton lawyer's indictment reveals 'bag of tricks' Attorney charged in Durham investigation pleads not guilty Attorney indicted on charge of lying to FBI as part of Durham investigation MORE said Friday the U.S. wanted more than just promises by the Libyan government that it would hold a ceasefire.

“We are going to be not responsive or impressed by words, we would have to see actions on the ground and that is not yet at all clear,” Clinton said. “We will continue to work with our partners in the international community to press Gadhafi to leave and to support the legitimate aspirations of the Libyan people.”

On Thursday, Gadhafi threatened to "cleanse" Benghazi.

Clinton said the U.N.’s passage of the resolution is just one step the international community is taking to remove Gadhafi from power and stop violence in the Libya.

“While this resolution is an important step, it is only that, an important step,” Clinton said.

She added that the top priority for the international community was to impose an immediate ceasefire and stop Gadhafi's military forces from killing Libyan civilians.

“Again, I want to take this one step at a time. We don't know what the final outcome will be,” Clinton said. “The first and overwhelmingly urgent outcome is to end the violence.”

The next step, Clinton said, was to “operationalize” the no-fly zone resolution.

The measure approved by the U.N. allows “all necessary measures” to protect Libyan civilians. This could include setting up a no-fly zone over Libya’s skies, but could also include air strikes on Libyan forces threatening Benghazi.

NATO may be getting involved.

Adm. James Stavridis, U.S. European Command chief and NATO's supreme allied commander, tweeted Friday: "On #Libya -- we are in detailed planning for a wide variety of contingencies from #NATO."

Stavridis is considered a contender to replace current Joint Chiefs Chairman Adm. Michael Mullen when his term expires this Fall.

Separately, in Yemen, 30 protesters against that country's government were reportedly killed by security forces and government loyalists, which drew condemnation from Obama. He called on Yemen's president to allow peaceful demonstrations.

"It is more important than ever for all sides to participate in an open and transparent process that addresses the legitimate concerns of the Yemeni people, and provides a peaceful, orderly and democratic path to a stronger and more prosperous nation," the president said in a statement.

John T. Bennett contributed.

This post was last updated at 1:39 p.m.