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Obama reiterates plans to boost middle class

President Obama's is reiterating the primary message of his State of the Union address: that Americans should back a slate of policies he says are designed to boost the middle class in light of a burgeoning economic recovery.

"Now we have to choose what we want that future to look like," he said in his weekly address on Saturday morning.

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The president touted plans to provide free tuition for two years of community college to certain students, expand a child care tax credit for working families and mending America's infrastructure that were laid out in his speech Tuesday and in the weeks prior.

"And we can afford to do these things by closing loopholes in our tax code that stack the decks for special interests and the superrich, and against responsible companies and the middle class," he said.

Republicans have already expressed skepticism with many of the administration's proposals. House Speaker John BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerBottom line Pelosi and Trump go a full year without speaking Jordan vows to back McCarthy as leader even if House loses more GOP seats MORE (R-Ohio) said in a joint interview with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellMcConnell tees up Trump judicial pick following Supreme Court vote Democrats warn GOP will regret Barrett confirmation GOP Senate confirms Trump Supreme Court pick to succeed Ginsburg MORE (R-Ky.) that will air on CBS's "60 Minutes" on Sunday that any plan to raise taxes on the wealthy was "Dead. Real dead."

But BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerBottom line Pelosi and Trump go a full year without speaking Jordan vows to back McCarthy as leader even if House loses more GOP seats MORE and McConnell also said that they believed that congressional Republicans could reach a deal with the White House in some areas, like giving Obama more authority to negotiate trade deals and the child care credit.

Obama also confronted the immediate Republican backlash to the speech in his remarks Saturday.

"I know that there are Republicans in Congress who disagree with my approach, and I look forward to hearing their ideas for how we can pay for what the middle class needs to grow," Obama said. "But what we can’t do is ... pretend there’s nothing we can do to help middle class families get ahead."

The address is the latest move by the White House to rally support around their proposals. The speech on Tuesday was preceded by a lengthy rollout that had the president traveling the country to preview the ideas that were the substance of the speech. In the days following the speech, the president traveled to Idaho and Kansas to rally support for his plans. 

Obama’s State of the Union was marked for its confident tone, despite November’s midterm drubbing for Democrats. Setting the tone for his final two years in office, Obama spoke about both the economic recovery and his plans for the remainder of his term.