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Five takeaways from Trump's inauguration

Five takeaways from Trump's inauguration
© Greg Nash

Donald Trump was sworn in as the 45th president of the United States on Friday in Washington. 

The day’s events contained all the pomp and circumstance meant to signify the peaceful transition of power. But Trump’s combative first speech as president also showcased his intent to shake things up in the nation’s capital. 

Here are five takeaways from the inauguration.

Trump is sticking to his campaign style

Anyone expecting Trump to pivot upon taking the oath of office was sorely mistaken. 

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In a blistering, 16-minute inaugural address, Trump doubled down on his populist vision for the country while promising voters he would stand up to the Washington establishment he railed against during the campaign. 

“The establishment protected itself, but not the citizens of our country,” said Trump, who has never held public office. “While they celebrated in our nation's capital, there was little to celebrate for struggling families all across our land.

“That all changes starting right here and right now because this moment is your moment, it belongs to you.”

Trump made several pleas for unity, including later at the congressional luncheon when he said he had a “lot of respect” for his former opponent, Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonCarter Page files defamation lawsuit against DNC Dems fear party is headed to gutter from Avenatti’s sledgehammer approach Election Countdown: Cruz, O'Rourke fight at pivotal point | Ryan hitting the trail for vulnerable Republicans | Poll shows Biden leading Dem 2020 field | Arizona Senate debate tonight MORE

But what stuck out more were the parallels to his campaign rhetoric.

He painted a picture of a country wracked by crisis — “American carnage,” he called it — and cast himself as the one who could fix it. 

Trump as schmoozer-in-chief 

President TrumpDonald John TrumpKey takeaways from the Arizona Senate debate Major Hollywood talent firm considering rejecting Saudi investment money: report Mattis says he thought 'nothing at all' about Trump saying he may leave administration MORE’s predecessor, Barack ObamaBarack Hussein ObamaChance the Rapper works as Lyft driver to raise money for Chicago schools Americans are safer from terrorism, but new threats are arising Donald Trump Jr. emerges as GOP fundraising force MORE, was famously averse to glad-handing with members of Congress. 

Obama long faced criticism that his aloof style hurt his ability to persuade lawmakers to advance his agenda, an accusation he long disputed. 

If Friday was any indication, Trump won’t be accused of the same thing. 

He turned on the charm when he appeared with lawmakers at the Capitol to sign his first orders as president. 

He joked with congressional leaders in both parties and offered them pens after signing the papers, which included formal nominations. 

The president teased House Minority Leader Nancy PelosiNancy Patricia D'Alesandro PelosiOn The Money: Deficit hits six-year high of 9 billion | Yellen says Trump attacks threaten Fed | Affordable housing set for spotlight in 2020 race Deficit hits six-year high of 9 billion: Treasury GOP has not done a good job of selling economic achievements, says ex-Trump adviser MORE (D-Calif.), a staunch environmentalist, joking he should give her the pen he used to nominate Scott PruittEdward (Scott) Scott PruittOvernight Energy: Trump administration doubles down on climate skepticism | Suspended EPA health official hits back | Military bases could host coal, gas exports Suspended EPA health official: Administration’s actions mean ‘kids are disposable’ Overnight Energy: Interior reprimands more than 1,500 for misconduct | EPA removes 22 Superfund sites from list | DOJ nominee on environment nears confirmation MORE to lead the Environmental Protection Agency.

“Here's one that I think Nancy would like ... Scott Pruitt,” he said. 

Of course, it remains to be seen how far Trump’s charm will get him. 

Republicans such as Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanElection Countdown: Cruz, O'Rourke fight at pivotal point | Ryan hitting the trail for vulnerable Republicans | Poll shows Biden leading Dem 2020 field | Arizona Senate debate tonight Paul Ryan to campaign for 25 vulnerable House Republicans GOP super PAC pushes back on report it skipped ad buys for California's Rohrabacher, Walters MORE (Wis.) took a liking to his style, but it’s not clear if the same could be said for Democrats. 

Dark day for Democrats

For liberals, Jan. 20 ushered in an unimaginable new reality. 

Today was supposed to be the day Hillary Clinton was sworn in as the first female president. 

Instead, Obama, the popular two-term president and first black man to serve in the nation's highest office, sat by as a man deplored by liberals took the oath of office. 

Trump has plans to take the country in an entirely different direction, starting with the dismantling of Obama's signature legislative achievement, the Affordable Care Act.

Democrats will be hard pressed to stop him. Republicans have full control over the executive and legislative branches of government for the first time since 2007. 

There was no more telling symbol of the end of the Obama Era then when television cameras cut away from the former president’s farewell speech at Andrews Air Force Base to focus their full attention on Trump’s activities at the Capitol.  

Obama is leaving the White House with his party in disarray at both the state and federal level. 

The party is seeking a new leader for the Democratic National Committee amid infighting among centrists and progressive, all while trying to build up their bench again for 2020.  

Democrats are trying to wrap their minds about how it all went wrong, and Trump's inauguration only served as a harsh reminder of their failure in November. 

No moment of unity 

Republican hopes the inauguration would serve as a unifying moment after a divisive election did not become a reality.  

Many attendees loudly booed Senate Democratic Leader Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerFive takeaways from the final Tennessee Senate debate Schumer rips Trump 'Medicare for all' op-ed as 'smears and sabotage' GOP senator suspects Schumer of being behind release of Ford letter MORE (N.Y.) during his speech and a large number could be seen waving a sarcastic goodbye as Obama flew on the presidential helicopter away from the Capitol complex. 

Protestors also came out in force. A handful of demonstrators were dragged away by security in the well of the Capitol. One woman got as close as the Marine Corps Band, playing directly below Trump's lecture, before police took her away. 

Images of protestors wreaking havoc downtown — throwing bricks and clashing with police — blanketed cable news in the hours after the inaugural address. 

Sen. Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersTrump attacks ‘Crazy Bernie’ Sanders over Medicare plans Overnight Defense: Trump says 'rogue killers' could be behind missing journalist | Sends Pompeo to meet Saudi king | Saudis may claim Khashoggi killed by accident | Ex-VA chief talks White House 'chaos' | Most F-35s cleared for flight Overnight Energy: Trump administration doubles down on climate skepticism | Suspended EPA health official hits back | Military bases could host coal, gas exports MORE (I-Vt.), a former presidential candidate and leading progressive, called the inauguration a “tough day” and dozens of Democratic lawmakers boycotted the day’s events. 

Trump enters office with a historically low favorability rating, another possible challenge going forward.

Trump is moving quickly to put his stamp on the executive branch.

“The time for empty talk is over,” Trump said in his inaugural address. “Now arrives the hour of action.”

Less than an hour after taking the oath of office, the White House’s webpage on climate change disappeared.
 
Trump’s first two Cabinet nominees, James MattisJames Norman MattisMattis says he thought 'nothing at all' about Trump saying he may leave administration Overnight Defense: Trump says 'rogue killers' could be behind missing journalist | Sends Pompeo to meet Saudi king | Saudis may claim Khashoggi killed by accident | Ex-VA chief talks White House 'chaos' | Most F-35s cleared for flight Americans are safer from terrorism, but new threats are arising MORE and John KellyJohn Francis KellyMORE, were confirmed by the Senate. 

 Mattis is a huge change for Washington. The retired general will be the first member of the military to lead the Pentagon in decades, and his appointment required passage of a waiver by Congress. Kelly will lead the Department of Homeland Security. 
 
Government agencies are bracing for massive budget cuts, as reported by The Hill. Those battles loom large over Trump’s first 100 days. 

The press is unsure whether it will be granted a workspace at the White House or access to senior officials. Trump’s chief strategist Steve BannonStephen (Steve) Kevin BannonBannon: Timing of Nikki Haley's departure 'horrific' Oversight Dems call for probe into citizenship question on 2020 census House Intelligence Committee to vote Friday on releasing dozens of Russia probe transcripts MORE – who relishes fights with the media – took a stroll through the White House press corps workspace on Friday.

The daily press briefing could also see an overhaul.

“It will be a daily something,” incoming press secretary Sean SpicerSean Michael SpicerGuilfoyle says she'd be open to White House job if Trump asks Cramer's comments on Kavanaugh allegations under scrutiny in close N. Dakota race Spicer: Press have 'a personal animus' against Trump administration MORE told The Hill this month.

“When I say 'something,' maybe it's a gaggle, maybe it's an on-camera briefing. Maybe we solicit talk radio and regional newspapers to submit questions — because they can't afford to be in Washington — but they still have a question. Maybe we just let the American people submit questions that we read off as well.”