Trump doubles down on voter fraud investigation

President Trump doubled down on his plans to launch an investigation into his claims of rampant voter fraud, saying there's "a lot to look into."

“We’re going to launch an investigation to find out,” Trump told ABC News in an interview set to air late Wednesday.

Trump has claimed, with no evidence, that millions of people voted illegally, costing him the popular vote to Democrat Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonSanders: 'Outrageous' to suggest Gabbard 'is a foreign asset' Clinton attacks on Gabbard become flashpoint in presidential race Saagar Enjeti: Clinton remarks on Gabbard 'shows just how deep the rot in our system goes' MORE. He said Wednesday it could "very well be" up to 5 million votes were cast illegally.

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"In addition to winning the Electoral College in a landslide, I won the popular vote if you deduct the millions of people who voted illegally," Trump wrote on Twitter in November.

Early Wednesday, he wrote on Twitter of plans to launch a “major investigation” into voter fraud.

In the ABC News interview, Trump claimed the many people who voted illegally all cast ballots for Clinton.

“And I will say this, of those votes cast, none of them come to me. None of them come to me. They would all be for the other side. None of them come to me,” the president said. 

“But when you look at the people that are registered: dead, illegal and two states, and some cases maybe three states, we have a lot to look into.”

Trump cited a Pew report that White House press secretary Sean Spicer referenced during a press briefing on Tuesday. 

According to fact-checking website PolitiFact, the Trump team has been misrepresenting the report's findings. 

The report, from 2012, is about outdated voting systems. When ABC News host David Muir told Trump that the Pew study's author assured him there was no evidence of voter fraud, Trump said the Pew researcher is "groveling."

“Then he’s groveling again,” Trump said. “You know, I always talk about the reporters that grovel when they want to write something that you want to hear but not necessarily millions of people want to hear, or have to hear.”