Trump taps Pence to head voter fraud investigation

President Trump will have Vice President Mike PenceMichael (Mike) Richard PenceIndiana sisters with history of opposing Pence donate millions to Dems Hillicon Valley: Trump signs off on sanctions for election meddlers | Russian hacker pleads guilty over botnet | Reddit bans QAnon forum | FCC delays review of T-Mobile, Sprint merger | EU approves controversial copyright law Overnight Defense: Trump marks 9/11 anniversary | Mattis says Assad 'has been warned' on chemical weapons | US identifies first remains of returned Korean war troops MORE oversee a special commission to investigate voter fraud, which he says helped Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham Clinton2016 pollsters erred by not weighing education on state level, says political analyst Could President Trump's talk of a 'red wave' cause his supporters to stay home in midterms? Dem group targets Trump in M voter registration campaign: report MORE win the popular vote.

“I’m going to set up a commission to be headed by Vice President Mike Pence and we’re going to look at it very, very carefully,” Trump told Fox News’s Bill O’Reilly in an interview airing Sunday afternoon before the Super Bowl.

“Look, Bill, we can be babies, but you take a look at the registration, you have illegals, you have dead people you have this, it’s really a bad situation, it’s really bad,” he said.

The announcement came up when Trump was asked about criticism that his claim of voter fraud is not backed up by the data.

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“Many people have come out and said I’m right, you know that,” Trump said. “You have illegals, you have dead people … it’s really a bad situation.”

The Washington Post reported that Pence pledged to GOP lawmakers at the annual Republican retreat in Philadelphia that the administration would initiate a “full evaluation” of voting rolls nationwide.

But Trump’s plans for a “major investigation” into what he claims were fraudulent votes by as many as 3 million to 5 million illegal immigrants may not get too far without congressional funding.

Already Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellFord's lawyer: Hearing doesn't appear to be designed for 'fair', 'respectful' treatment GOP opens door to holding Kavanaugh committee vote this week Press: Judge Kavanaugh must withdraw MORE (R-Ky.) has said he doesn’t want to spend federal funds on the investigation and leave it to state authorities.

But Trump on Sunday stuck to his claim of massive voter fraud, which even Republicans on Capitol Hill have questioned and The New York Times has dismissed as a “lie.”

Trump said there is evidence of votes being attributed to dead people and of people voting in different states in the same election.

McConnell and other GOP leaders agree there is voter fraud but not on the scale claimed by Trump.

“There is no evidence that it occurred in such a significant number that would have changed the presidential election,” he said on CNN’s “State of the Union” Sunday morning.