Schumer calls for Sessions to resign

Senate Democratic Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerA renewed emphasis on research and development funding is needed from the government Data shows seven Senate Democrats have majority non-white staffs Trump may be DACA participants' best hope, but will Democrats play ball? MORE (N.Y.) said Thursday that Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard Sessions Senate outlook slides for GOP Supreme Court blocks order that relaxed voting restrictions in Alabama Justice Dept. considering replacing outgoing US attorney in Brooklyn with Barr deputy: report MORE should resign and be investigated by the Department of Justice’s inspector general to determine whether he compromised an investigation into Russian influence.

“There cannot be even a scintilla of doubt about the impartiality and fairness of the attorney general, the top law enforcement official of the land,” Schumer told reporters at a news conference. “It’s clear Attorney General Sessions does not meet that test. Because the Department of Justice should be above reproach, for the good of the country, Attorney General Sessions should resign.”

Schumer, who for weeks has called for Sessions to recuse himself from the Justice Department’s investigation of contacts between Trump campaign officials and Russian intelligence agents, stepped up his demands after The Washington Post reported Wednesday night that Sessions misled Congress about meeting with the Russian ambassador.

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Schumer said there was nothing wrong with Sessions meeting with Ambassador Sergey Kislyak, but he transgressed by failing to tell lawmakers about it during his confirmation hearing earlier this year.

“If there was nothing wrong, why didn’t you come clean and tell the whole truth?” Schumer asked.

Schumer argued that Sessions had weeks to set the record straight after testifying before the Judiciary Committee, but let it stand.

Sessions told Minnesota Sen. Al FrankenAlan (Al) Stuart FrankenPolitical world mourns loss of comedian Jerry Stiller Maher to Tara Reade on timing of sexual assault allegation: 'Why wait until Biden is our only hope?' Democrats begin to confront Biden allegations MORE (D) that he did not have “any communications with the Russians” when asked if he knew of anyone affiliated with the Trump campaign having contact with the Russian government.

Schumer said it’s hard to believe that Sessions simply failed to remember the meeting because he would have been thoroughly briefed before the hearing and would have known the question about contacts with Russia was likely to come up.

Asked if he thought Sessions perjured himself before Congress, Schumer said he would leave that question to the experts.

“It was definitely extremely misleading to say the least about what he did,” he said.

Schumer said the Justice Department should appoint a special prosecutor and that, given questions about Sessions’s impartiality, the decision should be made by Acting Deputy Attorney General Dana Boente, a career civil servant.

He said the special prosecutor should be an individual of great experience who is beyond reproach and has no significant ties to either party. 

If the department refuses to appoint a special prosecutor, Schumer said Democrats will urge Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellLincoln Project offers list of GOP senators who 'protect' Trump in new ad State and local officials beg Congress to send more election funds ahead of November Teacher's union puts million behind ad demanding funding for schools preparing to reopen MORE (R-Ky.) and Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanBush, Romney won't support Trump reelection: NYT Twitter joins Democrats to boost mail-in voting — here's why Lobbying world MORE (R-Wis.) to pass a new version of the independent counsel law, which would give a three-judge panel authority to appoint an independent counsel.

The law was put on the books after the Watergate scandal in which President Nixon ordered the dismissal of special prosecutor Archibald Cox.

Schumer said the Justice Department’s inspector general “must immediately begin an investigation into the attorney general’s involvement” in the investigation to determine whether he has interfered or tried to derail it to protect himself or President Trump.

He noted the inspector general can act without additional authority from within the department or elsewhere in the administration.

An investigation into Sessions could review whether he disclosed meetings with Kislyak during his FBI background check or attempted to manage the work of career department officials looking into ties between the Trump campaign and Russian officials.

--This report was updated at 11:19 a.m.