House panel demands Trump release Comey 'tapes'

Congress wants to know if President Trump taped his conversations with fired FBI Director James Comey. 

A House panel led by Reps. Mike Conaway (R-Texas) and Adam SchiffAdam Bennett SchiffA new kind of hero? Last week's emotional TV may be a sign Officers offer harrowing accounts at first Jan. 6 committee hearing Live coverage: House panel holds first hearing on Jan. 6 probe MORE (D-Calif.) sent a letter on Friday to White House counsel Don McGahn demanding the release of any "tapes" of conversations between Comey and Trump. The president first suggested the existence of such tapes after Comey revealed that he wrote memos of his private conversations with Trump leading up to his firing.

Conaway and Schiff are representing the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence's Russia investigation, and a separate bipartisan group of Senate Judiciary Committee members led by Chairman Chuck GrassleyChuck GrassleyKaine says he has votes to pass Iraq War repeal in Senate Biden's ATF nominee on shaky ground in Senate Axne endorses Finkenauer Senate bid in Iowa MORE (R-Iowa) also sent letters requesting the notes Comey wrote documenting the same meetings with Trump.

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The Senate group requested the memos from Professor Daniel Richman, the friend Comey gave his notes to, and the House group requested any memos still in Comey's possession.

Schiff and Conaway provided a deadline of June 23.

In early May, Trump sparked a firestorm in the media when he appeared to threaten Comey with the existence of "tapes" that detailed conversations Comey and Trump had in the White House. On Friday, Trump revived that controversy when he refused to answer a question from reporters in the Rose Garden about whether the tapes truly exist.

“Lordy, I hope there are tapes,” Comey said during his testimony Thursday before the Senate Intelligence Committee.

During his testimony, Comey also revealed that he had leaked memos regarding his interactions with Trump to "a good friend" at Columbia Law School. Richman later confirmed he was the friend.