Health Secretary Price: More people will be covered under GOP bill than are currently covered

Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price said on Sunday that more people would be covered under Senate Republicans’ ObamaCare repeal-and-replace bill than are currently covered.

The Republican healthcare legislation covers a "hole" for people who fall into a mid-income bracket that the previous legislation did not, Price said. He noted the bill gives low-income individuals tax credits.

“One of the interesting things that is in this bill that wasn’t in previous iterations is the opportunity to make sure that those folks that actually fell into a gap below 100 percent of the poverty level, but above where a state might allow individuals on the Medicaid system," Price told Fox News’s Maria Bartiromo on “Sunday Morning Futures.”

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“This bill provides for coverage for those individuals through the tax credit process, and that’s something that’s new. That’s also one of the reasons we believe we’re going to cover more individuals than are currently covered,” he continued.

“The goal is to get every single American covered and have access to the kind of coverage they want,” Price said.

The Congressional Budget Office’s (CBO) assessment of the bill in June, however, estimated the plan would leave 22 million more people uninsured.

The White House has urged Americans to give little weight to the CBO score. 

Despite Price’s goal, the bill is viewed unfavorably by various GOP senators, almost all of whom are needed to support the legislation in order to get it passed.

Conservative Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulSenate rejects Paul proposal on withdrawing troops from Afghanistan The Hill's 12:30 Report: Democratic proposal to extend 0 unemployment checks Rand Paul urges Fauci to provide 'more optimism' on coronavirus MORE (R-Ky.) said he is against giving low-income Americans refundable tax credits to buy health insurance. Paul said he would vote against the bill.

Centrist Republicans, such as Sen. Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiSenators will have access to intelligence on Russian bounties on US troops Overnight Defense: Lawmakers demand answers on reported Russian bounties for US troops deaths in Afghanistan | Defense bill amendments target Germany withdrawal, Pentagon program giving weapons to police Senators push to limit transfer of military-grade equipment to police MORE (Alaska), on the other hand, have expressed concerns about the bill due to its deep cuts to Medicaid.

The bill would not fully phase out extra federal funding for Medicaid expansion under ObamaCare by 2024. However, sources have said some states would end their Medicaid expansion before 2024 if the Senate bill becomes law.

With Paul and Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsThe Hill's Coronavirus Report: Stagwell President Mark Penn says Trump is losing on fighting the virus; Fauci says U.S. 'going in the wrong direction' in fight against virus GOP senators debate replacing Columbus Day with Juneteenth as a federal holiday Senate passes extension of application deadline for PPP small-business loans MORE (R-Maine) saying they will not vote for the bill, Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellFormer HUD Secretary: Congress 'should invest 0B in direct rental assistance' OVERNIGHT ENERGY: House approves .5T green infrastructure plan | Rubio looks to defense bill to block offshore drilling, but some fear it creates a loophole | DC-area lawmakers push for analysis before federal agencies can be relocated House approves .5T green infrastructure plan MORE (R-Ky.) cannot afford to lose one more vote in his conference, assuming all Democrats vote against the legislation, according to The Hill's Whip List. 

McConnell was forced to delay next week's vote on the bill after Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainJuan Williams: Time for boldness from Biden Democrats lead in three battleground Senate races: poll Republican Scott Taylor wins Virginia primary, to face Elaine Luria in rematch MORE (R-Ariz.) announced he would be recovering from a medical procedure in Arizona.