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Secret Service vacates Trump Tower command post after lease dispute: report

The Secret Service has vacated its command post in Trump Tower over a dispute with the Trump Organization regarding the agency's lease.

The Washington Post reported Thursday that the Secret Service command post was moved to a trailer on a New York City sidewalk in early July. And a spokeswoman for President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump renews attacks against Tester over VA nominee on eve of Montana rally Trump submits 2017 federal income tax returns Corker: Trump administration 'clamped down' on Saudi intel, canceled briefing MORE's company has said the agency should seek space elsewhere. 

“After much consideration, it was mutually determined that it would be more cost effective and logistically practical for the Secret Service to lease space elsewhere,” Amanda Miller said in an email to the Post.

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But Secret Service spokeswoman Catherine Milhoan told The Hill that the agency "continues to work with GSA to obtain permanent work space in an appropriate location." 

"Throughout this process, there has been no impact to the security plan developed by the Secret Service," she continued. "For reasons that involve operational security and matters of force protection, the Secret Service will not disclose the current location of our command post."

The Secret Service previously leased space in Trump Tower just one floor below Trump's personal apartment, in order to protect the president's family.

The nature of the lease dispute is unclear, though the Post said two people familiar with the matter cited the price, among other lease conditions.

Trump has not visited Trump Tower since taking office in January; his wife Melania and youngest son Barron left the property to move into the White House in June. But the Secret Service still guards the building, which it regards as Trump’s permanent home.

The U.S. government is also leasing space in Trump Tower for a military office that provides support for the White House and handles the nuclear “football” – a mobile hub that the president would use to launch a nuclear strike.

The military lease was first reported by the Wall Street Journal in July.

The military leases that space for $130,000 a month from a businessman named Joel Anderson, rather than from Trump’s company itself.