Schumer tells crowd Trump’s ‘d---ed wall’ doesn’t represent US

Sen. Charles Schumer (D-N.Y.) on Saturday declared that the Statue of Liberty will continue to stand as the nation's iconic symbol of American immigration, "not that damned wall."

"We are going to continue to have the Statue of Liberty be our symbol, not that damned wall," the Democratic lawmaker said during the Global Citizen Festival in New York City, seemingly referring to President Trump's proposed border wall.

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During the event, Schumer stressed the importance of protecting foreign aid funding after Trump proposed a 30 percent cut to the foreign assistance package in his fiscal 2018 budget.

"We welcome the world’s tired and poor and huddled masses to our shores. We are a stronger country when we pledge to fight disease and poverty, not only within our borders but beyond them," the Senate’s minority leader told the crowd gathered in his home state, while calling for an increased foreign aid budget.

"I was shocked, outraged when the White House proposed major cuts to the international affairs budget this year. Foreign aid has improved countless lives in every corner of the world," Schumer continued, pointing to the advancements in education and cures for malaria.

In addition to fighting against the border wall, the vocal Trump critic declared that they must defeat "Trumpcare" this week to, he said, protect the health care of millions of Americans. 

Other well known names like former first lady Michelle ObamaMichelle LeVaughn Robinson ObamaEx-W.Va. official who made racist Michelle Obama remark defrauded ,000 from FEMA: report GOP senator dedicates heart photo to wife from Senate floor for Valentine's Day Barack Obama sends Valentine's message to Michelle: 'She does get down to Motown' MORE and singer Stevie Wonder also made appearances at the festival that focuses on addressing global issues. 

The musician's performance took a political turn when he knelt during his set, after the president had blasted NFL players who boycotted standing during the national anthem in the form of protest.