Trump accepts Tom Price's resignation

Health and Human Services (HHS) Secretary Tom PriceThomas (Tom) Edmunds PriceOvernight Health Care: CEO of largest private health insurer slams 'Medicare for All' plans | Dem bill targets youth tobacco use | CVS fined over fake painkiller prescriptions | Trump, first lady to discuss opioid crisis at summit HHS inspector general stepping down from watchdog role Ex-GOP lawmaker Handel to run for her former Georgia seat in 2020 MORE resigned on Friday, after an uproar over his use of private jets for official business. 

White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said in a statement that Price offered his resignation to President Trump on Friday, and that Trump had accepted.

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He is the first official to resign from Trump's Cabinet. 

"I have spent forty years both as a doctor and public servant putting people first. I regret that the recent events have created a distraction from these important objectives," Price said in his resignation letter.

"Success on these issues is more important than any one person. In order for you to move forward without further disruption, I am officially tendering my resignation," he continued.

Don Wright, HHS's acting assistant secretary for health, will serve as acting secretary effective Saturday. 

Price's position appeared to be at risk in recent days after Trump made several remarks about being disappointed in his conduct.

Asked by reporters Friday afternoon if Price had offered to resign, Trump replied: "No, but we'll see what happens later on."

It's a stunning downfall for Price, a former congressman from Georgia who was supposed to help bridge the gap between Congress and the administration as Republicans worked to repeal ObamaCare.

Instead, that repeal effort ended in failure this week, and Price is out of office after less than 10 months on the job.    

Price tried to save his job after Politico reported this week that his use of military flights and private jets has cost more than $1 million since May.

Seeking to contain the damage, Price apologized on Thursday and said he would pay for "his seat" on the flights, which comes to about $52,000.

But that did little to quell the uproar. Price's travel seemed to undermine Trump's promise to "drain the swamp" in in Washington, and the controversy was getting heavy play on cable news networks.

The president earlier on Friday said he didn't like the "optics" and was "not happy" with Price.

The controversy over his flights has become a major headache for the White House.

Other administrative officials, including Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott PruittEdward (Scott) Scott PruittOn The Money: Conservative blocks disaster relief bill | Trade high on agenda as Trump heads to Japan | Boeing reportedly faces SEC probe over 737 Max | Study finds CEO pay rising twice as fast as worker pay Overnight Energy: Democrats push EPA to collect 4K in 'excessive' Pruitt travel expenses | Greens angered over new rules for rocket fuel chemical | Inslee to join youth climate strikers in Las Vegas Democrats push EPA to collect 4K from Pruitt for 'excessive airfare expenses' MORE, have also faced criticism in recent days for using private planes for travel.

Price is now being investigated by HHS's inspector general and the House Oversight Committee.

The resignation sets up a huge confirmation fight in the Senate for Price's replacement.

Democrats have accused the administration of trying to sabotage ObamaCare, and whoever is nominated to replace Price will likely face questions about how they would manage the law.

Following the resignation, Democrats including Sens. Chuck SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerNo agreement on budget caps in sight ahead of Memorial Day recess Ex-White House photographer roasts Trump: 'This is what a cover up looked like' under Obama Pelosi: Trump 'is engaged in a cover-up' MORE (D-N.Y.) and Ron WydenRonald (Ron) Lee WydenHillicon Valley: Facebook won't remove doctored Pelosi video | Trump denies knowledge of fake Pelosi videos | Controversy over new Assange charges | House Democrats seek bipartisan group on net neutrality Manning: Additional Assange charges are feds using the law 'as a sword' Overnight Health Care — Presented by PCMA — Senators unveil sweeping bipartisan health care package | House lawmakers float Medicare pricing reforms | Dems offer bill to guarantee abortion access MORE, (D-Ore.) seized the moment to argue Trump’s next secretary pick should implement current health care law rather than seek to change it.

“I hope that his resignation will mark the beginning of a new chapter for the Trump administration’s health care agenda,” said Wyden, the ranking member on the Senate Finance Committee, which confirmed Price as secretary.

HHS could be without a secretary for ObamaCare's next open enrollment season, which begins Nov. 1, if a nominee isn't confirmed quickly.

- This story was updated at 5:20 p.m.