SPONSORED:

Report: Core elements of Trump’s National Security Strategy approved

Report: Core elements of Trump’s National Security Strategy approved
© Getty Images

President Trump has approved of a national security strategy and has the support of key Cabinet secretaries, Axios reported on Sunday. 

According to the report, the new strategy will be centered on new technological threats, homeland security and economic competition in regards to national security.

It will lay out the path for how the administration will handle various choices about foreign policy and national security, Axios said. 

ADVERTISEMENT

Secretary of State Rex TillersonRex Wayne TillersonTillerson: 'We squandered the best opportunity we had on North Korea' State Department sets up new bureau for cybersecurity and emerging technologies Lawmakers express concern about lack of young people in federal workforce MORE, Secretary of Defense James MattisJames Norman MattisWhat to watch for in Biden Defense pick's confirmation hearing Overnight Defense: Pentagon watchdog to probe extremism in US military | FBI chief warns of 'online chatter' ahead of inauguration | House conservative bloc opposes Austin waiver Conservative caucus opposes waiver for Biden's Pentagon pick MORE, and CIA Director Mike PompeoMike PompeoBiden should expand contact between US and Taiwanese officials On The Money: Retail sales drop in latest sign of weakening economy | Fast-food workers strike for minimum wage | US officials raise concerns over Mexico's handling of energy permits US officials raise concerns over Mexico's handling of energy permits MORE back the strategy, which will come under evaluation by the Cabinet this week in its meeting.

The report on the strategy comes as Trump continues to grapple with North Korea’s nuclear aggression and amid the ongoing investigations into Russia’s efforts to meddle in the United States election. 

Two aides to national security adviser H.R. McMaster worked with him on putting together the strategy, the report said.

Axios reports sources have said the document is "realistic" and "hard-nosed," adding that it is not as idealistic as previous strategies.