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McFarland contradicted herself on knowledge of Flynn's contacts with Russians: report

McFarland contradicted herself on knowledge of Flynn's contacts with Russians: report
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K.T. McFarland, President Trump’s former deputy national security adviser, sent an email during the transition that appears to undermine her testimony before Congress in which she denied knowing anything about Michael Flynn's contacts with top Kremlin officials, The New York Times reported Monday.

McFarland told lawmakers on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee in July that she did not discuss or have any knowledge of Flynn's contact with then-Russian Ambassador to the U.S. Sergey Kislyak, the newspaper reported, citing Senate documents.

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“I am not aware of any of the issues or events as described above,” McFarland said in response to a written question from Sen. Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerSanders, Harris set to criss-cross Iowa Election Countdown: Small-donor donations explode | Russian woman charged with midterm interference | Takeaways from North Dakota Senate debate | O'Rourke gives 'definitive no' to 2020 run | Dems hope Latino voters turn Arizona blue Kamala Harris rallies voters in South Carolina MORE (D-N.J.) after the hearing about knowledge of Flynn's contacts with Kislyak.

A message McFarland sent on Dec. 29 while serving on the Trump transition team appears to be in conflict with her remarks before Congress, according to an email obtained by the Times.

In the email, she reportedly tells another campaign aide that Flynn planned to talk to Kislyak later that day. 

The inconsistency will likely add to the already intense scrutiny on the communication between Trump campaign aides and Moscow during the 2016 presidential campaign.

The Times report comes after Flynn, President Trump's former national security adviser, pleaded guilty on Friday to lying to federal agents about his contacts with the Russian ambassador. 

The newspaper was unable to reach McFarland for requests to comment.

She served in the White House as Flynn's deputy national security adviser until May. 

McFarland is now waiting for Senate confirmation after being tapped to serve as ambassador to Singapore.

Booker, who initially asked her the question, called the discrepancy an "alarming development."

“Recent developments suggest that Ms. McFarland gave false testimony to the United States Senate on a matter as significant as communications between the Russian government and the Trump transition team,” he told the Times in a statement.

“If this is the case, this is an alarming development, and another example of a pattern of deception on the part of Trump’s closest associates regarding their connections and communications to Russian government officials,” he said.