Trump didn't seem to have complete understanding of Jerusalem decision: report

President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump passes Pence a dangerous buck Overnight Health Care — Presented by American Health Care Association — Trump taps Pence to lead coronavirus response | Trump accuses Pelosi of trying to create panic | CDC confirms case of 'unknown' origin | Schumer wants .5 billion in emergency funds Trump nods at reputation as germaphobe during coronavirus briefing: 'I try to bail out as much as possible' after sneezes MORE did not completely grasp the ramifications of recognizing Jerusalem as Israel's capital, several advisers told The Washington Post.

Trump wanted to seem "pro-Israel" and focused on "making a deal," two advisers told the Post.

According to the newspaper, some administration officials voicing their support for the decision included Vice President Pence and adviser Jared Kushner, who is also Trump's son-in-law.

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Others, though, advocated against the move, including Secretary of State Rex TillersonRex Wayne TillersonTrump lashes out over Kelly criticism: 'He misses the action' Timeline: Trump and Romney's rocky relationship Top Democrat demands Barr recuse himself from case against Turkish bank MORE and Defense Secretary James MattisJames Norman MattisFed chief issues stark warning to Congress on deficits Why US democracy support matters Hillicon Valley: DOJ indicts four Chinese military officers over Equifax hack | Amazon seeks Trump deposition in 'war cloud' lawsuit | Inside Trump's budget | Republican proposes FTC overhaul MORE.

Trump on Wednesday recognized Jerusalem as Israel's capital and announced plans to relocate the U.S. Embassy there.

"I have determined that it is time to officially recognize Jerusalem as the capital of Israel," Trump said during a speech in the Diplomatic Reception Room of the White House.

Trump has vowed to broker a historic peace accord between Israel and Palestine. On Wednesday, he said he will try to resolve the decades-old conflict his way, arguing that past approaches, such as delaying the recognition, have not worked.

“It would be folly to assume that repeating the exact same formula would now produce a different or better result,” he said, calling his announcement “a long-overdue step to advance the peace process and work towards a lasting agreement.”

Arab and European leaders warned that formally recognizing Jerusalem as Israel's capital would push Middle East peace talks further off track.