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Trump says Gillibrand begged for donations 'and would do anything for them'

President TrumpDonald John TrumpBiden team wants to understand Trump effort to 'hollow out government agencies' Trump's remaking of the judicial system Overnight Defense: Trump transgender ban 'inflicts concrete harms,' study says | China objects to US admiral's Taiwan visit MORE early Tuesday blasted Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandDemocratic senators urge Facebook to take action on anti-Muslim bigotry Social media responds to Harris making history: 'I feel like our ancestors are rejoicing' Ocasio-Cortez says she doesn't plan on 'staying in the House forever' MORE (D-N.Y.) for coming to his office "begging" for donations and as someone who "would do anything for them."

The broadside against Gillibrand comes a day after the New York Democrat said Trump should resign from the presidency because of the accusations of sexual misconduct numerous women have made against him.

Gillibrand said the accusations against Trump are “credible” and should be investigated, and she told CNN’s Christiane Amanpour that the president should resign.

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Less than 24 hours later, Trump was on Twitter calling Gillibrand a “flunky” for Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerUS national security policy in the 117th Congress and a new administration Voters say Biden should make coronavirus vaccine a priority: poll New York City subway service could be slashed 40 percent, officials warn MORE (D-N.Y.) and a “lightweight” lawmaker.

He also made a reference to Gillibrand's statement this month that President Bill ClintonWilliam (Bill) Jefferson ClintonTrump's remaking of the judicial system Voters want a strong economy and leadership, Democrats should listen Women set to take key roles in Biden administration MORE should have resigned from office, calling her "very disloyal" to the former president.

Gillibrand responded later on Tuesday, ripping Trump and saying he could not silence her.

 

Gillibrand has been a voice against sexual harassment for years, and made a name for herself in the Senate by pushing for reforms to how the military handles sexual misconduct cases.

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She's been in the center of the news over the last week as allegations of sexual misconduct against men in politics, entertainment, the media and other fields have washed through the headlines.

Gillibrand, seen by many as a potential 2020 presidential candidate, was the first Democratic senator to call on Sen. Al FrankenAlan (Al) Stuart FrankenThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by the UAE Embassy in Washington, DC - Trump, Biden clash over transition holdup, pandemic plans The Hill's Morning Report - Fearing defeat, Trump claims 'illegal' ballots The Hill's Morning Report - Biden inches closer to victory MORE (D-Minn.) to resign last week. Franken had been accused by multiple women of groping and forced kissing.

In November, she said that Clinton should have resigned over the Monica Lewinsky affair.

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The remark about Clinton drew a withering response on Twitter from longtime Clinton aide Philippe Reines, who has worked for both Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonThe Hill's 12:30 Report - Third vaccine candidate with 90% efficacy Biden won — so why did Trump's popularity hit its highest point ever? The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by the UAE Embassy in Washington, DC - Calls mount to start transition as Biden readies Cabinet picks MORE and the former president.

He called Gillibrand a "hypocrite" for taking the Clintons' "endorsements, money, and seat," as Gillibrand replaced Hillary Clinton as New York's senator when Clinton became secretary of State in the Obama administration.

"Interesting strategy for 2020 primaries. Best of luck," he concluded. 

This story was updated at 9:22 a.m.