Trump says Gillibrand begged for donations 'and would do anything for them'

President TrumpDonald John TrumpHouse Republican threatens to push for Rosenstein impeachment unless he testifies Judge suggests Trump’s tweet about Stormy Daniels was ‘hyperbole’ not defamation Rosenstein faces Trump showdown MORE early Tuesday blasted Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten Elizabeth GillibrandKamala Harris calls for Senate to protect Mueller probe as Rosenstein faces potential dismissal This week: Kavanaugh nomination thrown into further chaos Gillibrand calls for Kavanaugh nomination to be withdrawn MORE (D-N.Y.) for coming to his office "begging" for donations and as someone who "would do anything for them."

The broadside against Gillibrand comes a day after the New York Democrat said Trump should resign from the presidency because of the accusations of sexual misconduct numerous women have made against him.

Gillibrand said the accusations against Trump are “credible” and should be investigated, and she told CNN’s Christiane Amanpour that the president should resign.

Less than 24 hours later, Trump was on Twitter calling Gillibrand a “flunky” for Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerTrump, GOP regain edge in Kavanaugh battle READ: President Trump’s exclusive interview with Hill.TV The Hill's 12:30 Report — Trump slams Sessions in exclusive Hill.TV interview | Kavanaugh accuser wants FBI investigation MORE (D-N.Y.) and a “lightweight” lawmaker.

He also made a reference to Gillibrand's statement this month that President Bill ClintonWilliam (Bill) Jefferson ClintonFeehery: Are you (October) surprised? Why must everything Rosenstein be filled with drama?   Judge denies bid to move lawsuit over Trump national monument rollbacks to Utah MORE should have resigned from office, calling her "very disloyal" to the former president.

Gillibrand responded later on Tuesday, ripping Trump and saying he could not silence her.

 

Gillibrand has been a voice against sexual harassment for years, and made a name for herself in the Senate by pushing for reforms to how the military handles sexual misconduct cases.

She's been in the center of the news over the last week as allegations of sexual misconduct against men in politics, entertainment, the media and other fields have washed through the headlines.

Gillibrand, seen by many as a potential 2020 presidential candidate, was the first Democratic senator to call on Sen. Al FrankenAlan (Al) Stuart FrankenNelson campaign to donate K from Al Franken group to charity Sexual assault is not a game — stop using women to score political points Election Countdown: Trump confident about midterms in Hill.TV interview | Kavanaugh controversy tests candidates | Sanders, Warren ponder if both can run | Super PACs spending big | Two states open general election voting Friday | Latest Senate polls MORE (D-Minn.) to resign last week. Franken had been accused by multiple women of groping and forced kissing.

In November, she said that Clinton should have resigned over the Monica Lewinsky affair.

The remark about Clinton drew a withering response on Twitter from longtime Clinton aide Philippe Reines, who has worked for both Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham Clinton2016 pollsters erred by not weighing education on state level, says political analyst Could President Trump's talk of a 'red wave' cause his supporters to stay home in midterms? Dem group targets Trump in M voter registration campaign: report MORE and the former president.

He called Gillibrand a "hypocrite" for taking the Clintons' "endorsements, money, and seat," as Gillibrand replaced Hillary Clinton as New York's senator when Clinton became secretary of State in the Obama administration.

"Interesting strategy for 2020 primaries. Best of luck," he concluded. 

This story was updated at 9:22 a.m.