Key Trump adviser regularly promoted far-right conspiracy theories: report

Key Trump adviser regularly promoted far-right conspiracy theories: report
© Getty

A senior White House adviser at the Homeland Security Department repeatedly pushed a number of far-right conspiracy theories in radio appearances before joining the Trump administration.

CNN's K-File reported Thursday that Frank Wuco, who is charged with helping enforce President TrumpDonald John TrumpMueller report findings could be a 'good day' for Trump, Dem senator says Trump officials heading to China for trade talks next week Showdown looms over Mueller report MORE's executive orders, regularly propagated unfounded and outlandish claims, including many about former Obama administration officials.

Among them was the claim that former President Obama's memoir was actually penned by anti-war activist and radical Bill Ayers, as well as claims that former Attorney General Eric HolderEric Himpton HolderGOP eager to exploit Dem court-packing fight Jeff Sessions returns to Justice Department to retrieve Cabinet chair The Hill's 12:30 Report: Trump steps up attacks on McCain MORE had once been a member of the Black Panthers and that former CIA Director John Brennan had converted to Islam.

ADVERTISEMENT

There is no evidence to support such claims, which are widely considered false. 

Past comments by Wuco questioning where Obama was born surfaced earlier this month. The Homeland Security Department defended Wuco against criticism after those comments surfaced.

"Mr. Wuco works every day to keep the American people safe by helping to implement the President's security-focused agenda, including raising the global bar for vetting and screening of potential terrorists," then-acting DHS press secretary Tyler Houlton told CNN.

"Years-old comments cherry-picked from thousands of hours on the air have no bearing on his ability to perform his job for the American people."

According to K-File, Wuco, a former conservative talk radio show host, also claimed in 2012 that the parents of Huma Abedin, a longtime aide to Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonIf Mueller's report lacks indictments, collusion is a delusion Conservatives wage assault on Mueller report The wisdom of Trump's lawyers, and the accountability that must follow Mueller's report MORE, were members of the Muslim Brotherhood, an Egypt-based Islamist group.

"Her parents were both Muslim Brotherhood," Wuco said on a right-wing radio show. "She maintains very close ties to Muslim Brotherhood organizations here in the United States such as the Islamic Society of North America and [the Council on American-Islamic Relations]."

The claims about Abedin and her parents have been widely debunked.